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Inter-agency adult support and protection practice: A realistic evaluation with police, health and social care professionals

Sundari Joseph (School of Nursing and Midwifery, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK)
Susan Klein (Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, UK)
Samantha McCluskey (Professional Standards Department, Police Scotland, Stirling, UK)
Penny Woolnough (Division of Psychology, University of Abertay, Dundee, UK)
Lesley Diack (School of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, UK)

Journal of Integrated Care

ISSN: 1476-9018

Article publication date: 3 December 2018

Issue publication date: 8 February 2019

1749

Abstract

Purpose

Collaborative inter-agency working is of paramount importance for the public protection agenda worldwide. The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the findings from a research study on the inter-agency working within adult support and protection (ASP) roles in the police, health and social care.

Design/methodology/approach

This realistic evaluation study with two inter-related phases was funded by the Scottish Institute for Policing Research. This paper reports on Phase 1 which identified existing gaps in the implementation of effective inter-agency practice by reviewing the “state of play” in inter-agency collaboration between the police and health and social care professionals. In total, 13 focus groups comprising representatives from Police Scotland (n=52), Social Care (n=31) and Health (n=18), engaged in single profession and mixed profession groups addressing issues including referral and information exchange.

Findings

On analysing context-mechanism-outcome (CMO), gaps in joint working were identified and attributed to the professionals’ own understanding of inter-agency working and the expectations of partner agencies. It recommended the need for further research and inter-agency training on public protection.

Research limitations/implications

This unique Scottish study successfully identified the inter-agency practices of health, social services and police. By means of a modified realistic evaluation approach, it provides an in-depth understanding of the challenges that professionals face on a day-to-day basis when safeguarding adults and informed strategic recommendations to overcome the barriers to good practices in organisational working. The methods used to determine CMO could benefit other researchers to develop studies exploring the complexities of multi-causal effects of cross-boundary working. The use of the same case study in each focus group helped to neutralise bias. However, the voluntary nature of participation could have resulted in biased perceptions. The limited numbers of health professionals may have resulted in less representation of health sector views.

Practical implications

This paper reports on a Scottish study that focused on the coordinated and integrated practices amongst the police, health and social services’ professionals who support and protect adult members of society at risk of harm and has implications for their practice.

Social implications

Whilst the focus of this study has been on ASP, the conclusions and recommendations are transferable to public protection issues in many other contexts.

Originality/value

Studies on the joint-working practices amongst police and health and social services’ professionals who support and protect adult members of society at risk of harm are uncommon. This study investigated professionals’ perceptions of gaps and concerns pertaining to integrated working by means of a realistic evaluation approach. It recommended the need for further research and inter-agency training on public protection.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The following people are acknowledged for their valuable contribution to this research project: all the ASP professionals in Scotland who participated in the focus groups: project team member: Inga Heyman Lecturer, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh; steering group: Paul Comely, National Adult Protection Coordinator, at the time of the project: WithScotland www.withscotland.org, Albert Donald, Convenor of Adult Protection Committees, Grampian, Detective Superintendent Martin Dunn, Specialist Crime Division, Police Scotland, National lead for Adult Protection, James Ferguson, Consultant Surgeon in Emergency Medicine, NHS Grampian National Clinical Lead for ‘The Scottish Centre for Telehealth and Telecare’ (SCTT), John Myles, Independent Chair Adult Protection Committee, Fife, Kenny O’Brien, Adult Protection Unit Co-ordinator, Aberdeen City Council, Dr Rebecca Riddell, Locum General Practitioner, Lead for Clinical Communication Division of Medical and Dental Education, University of Aberdeen; support staff: Midj Falconer, Research Fellow, Alison Reddish, Research Assistant.

Citation

Joseph, S., Klein, S., McCluskey, S., Woolnough, P. and Diack, L. (2019), "Inter-agency adult support and protection practice: A realistic evaluation with police, health and social care professionals", Journal of Integrated Care, Vol. 27 No. 1, pp. 50-63. https://doi.org/10.1108/JICA-06-2018-0041

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited

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