To read this content please select one of the options below:

“How’d you sleep?” measuring business travelers’ sleep quality and satisfaction in hotels

Hsiangting Shatina Chen (Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA)
Kimberly Severt (Department of Human Nutrition and Hospitality Management, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA)
Yeon Ho Shin (Department of Human Nutrition and Hospitality Management, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA)
Adam Knowlden (Department of Health Science, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA)
Tyra W. Hilliard (School of Business and Public Management, College of Coastal Georgia, Brunswick, Georgia, USA)

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights

ISSN: 2514-9792

Article publication date: 11 April 2018

Issue publication date: 23 August 2018

2445

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore business travelers’ sleep experience in hotels by measuring sleep quality and determining the extent to which hotel attributes, demographic characteristics, and hotel quality level influence their sleep quality while staying in hotels.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a self-reported survey to obtain data from business travelers who have stayed in a hotel at least two nights for a business trip in the past 30 days. A total of 304 business travelers were surveyed in this study.

Findings

The results indicated that there was a difference in the factors that influenced business travelers’ overall satisfaction with sleep in mid-scale (2.5-3.5 stars) vs upscale hotels (4+stars). The findings showed that business travelers generally had lower sleep quality at hotels and they were more likely affected by noise both outside and inside the guestroom, as well as material elements inside the room.

Originality/value

This study represents a pioneering attempt at exploring business travelers’ sleep quality and satisfaction with sleep in hotels. Furthermore, this study contributes to the limited research addressing sleep quality as a fundamental function of hotel services. Also, this is the first study to measure business travelers’ sleep quality in hotels by using the sleep quality scale.

Keywords

Citation

Chen, H.S., Severt, K., Shin, Y.H., Knowlden, A. and Hilliard, T.W. (2018), "“How’d you sleep?” measuring business travelers’ sleep quality and satisfaction in hotels", Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, Vol. 1 No. 3, pp. 188-202. https://doi.org/10.1108/JHTI-11-2017-0015

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited

Related articles