The advertising of E. Remington & Sons: the creation of an iconic brand, 1854-1888

Robert A. Henning (Campbell County Rockpile Museum, Gillette, Wyoming, USA)
Terrence H. Witkowski (California State University, Long Beach, California, USA)

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing

ISSN: 1755-750X

Publication date: 4 November 2013

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to document and analyze how E. Remington & Sons built a valuable firearms brand through its advertising in the period 1854-1888.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses qualitative methods. Primary source documents include newspapers, journals, and catalogs. The advertising analyzed came primarily from three periodicals – Harper's Weekly, The Army Navy Journal, and American Agriculturalist – that together reached a broad audience of American firearms consumers.

Findings

Advertising to both civilian and military markets, Remington used a number of appeals including expert testimonials, fears of robbery and home invasion, and boasts of quality, military contracts, and honors from shooting competitions. Until the late 1870s, Remington used manufacturer's advertising more than its competitors.

Originality/value

Business historians have not seriously addressed Remington or other gun advertising and branding during the nineteenth century, while firearms historians have largely relegated these ads and other promotional ephemera to illustrative accessory roles, not as subjects of independent consideration. By investigating the rise of this important firearms brand, the research sheds light on the evolution of the American firearms industry and the prevailing gun culture.

Keywords

Citation

A. Henning, R. and H. Witkowski, T. (2013), "The advertising of E. Remington & Sons: the creation of an iconic brand, 1854-1888", Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, Vol. 5 No. 4, pp. 418-448. https://doi.org/10.1108/JHRM-11-2012-0028

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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