Coordination to choreography: the evolution of humanitarian supply chains

Ray Grange (School of Business, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland)
Graham Heaslip (School of Business, Galway Mayo Institute of Technology, Galway, Ireland) (Hanken School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland)
Caroline McMullan (School of Business, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland)

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management

ISSN: 2042-6747

Publication date: 4 December 2019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how coordination has evolved in humanitarian logistics (HL), what were the triggers for change and how have they been facilitated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies a systematic literature review of academic journals.

Findings

This is the first paper to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context. The research revealed that network coordination has moved on in the commercial sector to include orchestration and now, choreography concepts which have not been tested in HL literature. This reveals a lag exists between HL research and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper represents an exploratory study and provides the basis for further research on the concepts of orchestration and choreography in HL. The paper sets a research agenda for academics.

Practical implications

This paper is the first to discuss the concepts of network orchestration and choreography in a humanitarian context.

Originality/value

The areas of orchestration and choreography have received limited consideration within the humanitarian aid logistics literature to date. This paper is designed to redress this shortfall. As a result, it is hoped that it will act as a catalyst for further research and to widen and deepen the resultant debate with a view to improving the outcome for those affected by current and future disasters.

Keywords

Citation

Grange, R., Heaslip, G. and McMullan, C. (2019), "Coordination to choreography: the evolution of humanitarian supply chains", Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Vol. 10 No. 1, pp. 21-44. https://doi.org/10.1108/JHLSCM-12-2018-0077

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Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

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