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Occupational health and safety orientation in the oil and gas industry of Ghana: analysis of knowledge and attitudinal influences on compliance

Rhoda Ansah Quaigrain (Department of Civil Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada)
De-Graft Owusu-Manu (Department of Construction Technology and Management, KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana)
David John Edwards (School of Engineering and the Built Environment, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK and Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa)
Mavis Hammond (Institute of Distance Learning, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana)
Mabel Hammond (Institute of Distance Learning, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana)
Igor Martek (School of Architecture and the Built Environment, Deakin University Faculty of Science Engineering and Built Environment, Geelong, Australia)

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology

ISSN: 1726-0531

Article publication date: 1 March 2022

Issue publication date: 23 April 2024

760

Abstract

Purpose

Occupational safety issues among employees remains a contemporary and omnipresent concern. In developing countries, safety-related problems are amplified, resulting in higher incidences of serious accidents and occupational diseases. This study aims to evaluate employees’ knowledge and attitudes toward occupational health and safety, and how these influence overall occupational health and safety compliance. Ghana’s oil and gas industry provides the contextual backdrop for this research, given it is characterized by high rates of injury.

Design/methodology/approach

A positivist and deductive research strategy was used to quantitatively analyze both primary and secondary data sources. A structured survey was administered to industry employees, and multiple linear regression was used to establish the effects of employee’s knowledge and attitude toward occupational health hazards on overall health and safety compliance.

Findings

The findings indicate that most employees had both a high level of knowledge and positive attitude toward mitigating occupational health hazards. Moreover, the study reveals that most employees complied with occupational health safety practices. However, the study also reveals that the effect of employees’ knowledge and attitude toward occupational health hazards does not translate into deployment of comprehensive safety practices. Interestingly, female employees were found to be more knowledgeable and compliant with occupational health and safety practices than their male counterparts.

Practical implications

Premised upon the findings, the study recommends: implementation of relevant education and training programs encompassing the proper usage of machinery and equipment, tailored hazard safety training appropriate to specific employee job requirements, effective dissemination of risk information and governance initiatives that enforce strict adherence to correct safety procedures.

Originality/value

The study uniquely examines the influence of employee’s knowledge of health and safety to overall compliance within the oil and gas industry. Cumulatively, the study’s findings and recommendations contribute to improving the occupational health and safety outcomes within the industry.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The project has been financially supported by a grant from the National Research Foundation (NRF), South Africa.

Citation

Quaigrain, R.A., Owusu-Manu, D.-G., Edwards, D.J., Hammond, M., Hammond, M. and Martek, I. (2024), "Occupational health and safety orientation in the oil and gas industry of Ghana: analysis of knowledge and attitudinal influences on compliance", Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, Vol. 22 No. 3, pp. 795-812. https://doi.org/10.1108/JEDT-11-2021-0664

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited

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