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Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts

Catherine A. Quinn (Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Leanne Hides (School of Psychology, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia)
Anna Harding (University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Australia)
Dominique de Andrade (Centre for Youth Substance Abuse Research, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Hollie Wilson (Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Lance Mergard (NightSafe, ChaplainWatch, Brisbane, Australia)

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice

ISSN: 2056-3841

Article publication date: 12 June 2017

Abstract

Purpose

Significant alcohol use increases the risk of injuries and violence in young people. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, alcohol-related injury or violence among young people in a night-time economy (NTE).

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 217 young adults, 135 of whom required street service care on a Friday or Saturday evening in an Australian entertainment district. The remaining 88 young adults were a matched control sample. Participants were surveyed and provided a breathalyser sample. A multinomial logistic regression was conducted to examine the relationship between blood alcohol content (BAC) level, subjective intoxication, gender, illicit drug use, age, preloading, total drinks consumed, and the receipt of care for intoxication, injury, or violence.

Findings

Of those who received care, 70.4 per cent received it for intoxication, 19.3 per cent for injury, and 10.3 per cent following a violent incident. Male gender and high BAC level were associated with receiving support following a violent incident. High-subjective intoxication and female gender were associated with receiving support for injury.

Practical implications

Results demonstrate the factors associated with receiving street service care for young people in the NTE experiencing non-emergent health needs. Further research is required to examine the impact of such a service on crime, injuries, and frontline service resources.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine factors associated with receiving street service care for alcohol intoxication, injury, or violence in a NTE. Results inform policy and practice relating to the provision of street service care in the NTE for non-emergent health problems, and how this interrelates with other frontline services.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Leanne Hides is supported by an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship (FT120100780). The authors would like to acknowledge the assistance in recruitment by the ChaplainWatch staff and the young people who have agreed to participate in this research.

Citation

Quinn, C.A., Hides, L., Harding, A., de Andrade, D., Wilson, H. and Mergard, L. (2017), "Alcohol-related harms and street service care in entertainment districts", Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, Vol. 3 No. 2, pp. 142-152. https://doi.org/10.1108/JCRPP-01-2017-0002

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited