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The influence of brand schematicity on the importance of product cues: self-purchasing versus gift-giving situations

Laurence Carsana (Grenoble Alpes University, IAE, CERAG, France)
Alain Jolibert (INSEEC Business School, Le Bourget du lac, France)

Journal of Consumer Marketing

ISSN: 0736-3761

Article publication date: 8 May 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the influence of self-purchasing versus gift-giving situations on the importance of product cues and the moderating effect of brand schematicity.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via an online survey of 285 French consumers for wine and 139 French consumers for whisky. The interaction effect of the gift-giving situation and brand schematicity on the importance of product cues was then investigated.

Findings

The results differed, depending on the importance of brand cue. For the whisky category (high brand importance), brand schematicity had no influence on the importance of cues. For the wine category (low brand importance), brand schematicity moderated the influence of the gift-giving situation on the importance of extrinsic cues such as commercial brand. Brand schematicity and the situation of gift-giving also influence the number of important cues which consumers take into account when making their choice. In low-involvement purchasing situations, brand-aschematic consumers use fewer choice criteria than brand-schematic consumers, whereas in high-involvement purchasing situations, regardless of their level of brand schematicity, consumers use the same number of criteria to make their selection.

Practical implications

When the commercial brand is a salient cue and regardless of the purchasing situation, it is important to provide information on the brand to consumers through any format, such as social media, leaflets, flash codes, in-store digital display, etc. When the commercial brand is not a salient cue, brand schematicity may be relevant to a segment of consumers because this consumer profile may need more information and will focus on the commercial brand. Brand managers could develop a specific approach to schematic consumers based on brand content, for example, brand managers could provide marketing materials (e.g. leaflets, flash codes, mobile apps) to retail store managers explaining the origin and value of the commercial brand. Consumers could also be provided with digital devices (such as tablets), which they could use to search for information according to these cues before choosing their product. Social media and online brand community could also provide more details about the brand and may provide an interactive area for discussions with consumers.

Originality/value

There has been little research on the effect of brand schematicity on the importance of product cues. To the authors’ knowledge, the interaction between brand schematicity and purchase according to product category has not previously been studied. The influence of brand schematicity changes depending on the importance given to brand cues.

Keywords

Citation

Carsana, L. and Jolibert, A. (2017), "The influence of brand schematicity on the importance of product cues: self-purchasing versus gift-giving situations", Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 34 No. 3, pp. 255-267. https://doi.org/10.1108/JCM-07-2016-1869

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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