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PROCEE: a PROstate Cancer Evaluation and Education serious game for African Caribbean men

Georgina Cosma (Department of Computing and Technology, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
David Brown (Department of Computing and Technology, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Nicholas Shopland (Department of Computing and Technology, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Steven Battersby (Department of Computing and Technology, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Sarah Seymour-Smith (College of Business Law and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Matthew Archer (Department of Computing and Technology, School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)
Masood Khan (Department of Urology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK)
A. Graham Pockley (John van Geest Cancer Research Centre, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK)

Journal of Assistive Technologies

ISSN: 1754-9450

Article publication date: 19 December 2016

Abstract

Purpose

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in men in the UK. Black men are in a higher prostate cancer risk group possibly due to inherent genetic factors. The purpose of this paper is to introduce PROstate Cancer Evaluation and Education (PROCEE), an innovative serious game aimed at providing prostate cancer information and risk evaluation to black African-Caribbean men.

Design/methodology/approach

PROCEE has been carefully co-designed with prostate cancer experts, prostate cancer patients and members of the black African-Caribbean community in order to ensure that it meets the real needs and expectations of the target audience.

Findings

During the co-design process, the users defined an easy to use and entertaining game which can effectively raise awareness, inform users about prostate cancer and their risk, and encourage symptomatic men to seek medical attention in a timely manner.

Originality/value

During focus group evaluations, users embraced the game and emphasised that it can potentially have a positive impact on changing user behaviour among high risk men who are experiencing symptoms and who are reluctant to visit their doctor.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank Rose Thompson (Black and Ethnic Minority Ethnic (BME) Cancer Communities), Friends and Bredrins (FAB) Prostate Cancer Support Group, Lisa Jackson (actor/director), Professor Robert C. Rees in the John van Geest Cancer Research Centre and Sue Dewey, formerly in the John van Geest Cancer Research Centre, and to all the community members who provided feedback about the serious game. This study was funded from the NHS Nottingham City Clinical Commissioning Group’s allocation of National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Capability Funding (Contract Number: CCG/NTU/02/RCF/13-14). The authors would also like to acknowledge the financial support of the John and Lucille van Geest Foundation and the Healthcare and Bioscience iNet, an ERDF funded initiative managed by Medilink East Midlands. The funders had no role in study design, serious game design, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

Citation

Cosma, G., Brown, D., Shopland, N., Battersby, S., Seymour-Smith, S., Archer, M., Khan, M. and Pockley, A.G. (2016), "PROCEE: a PROstate Cancer Evaluation and Education serious game for African Caribbean men", Journal of Assistive Technologies, Vol. 10 No. 4, pp. 199-210. https://doi.org/10.1108/JAT-12-2015-0035

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2016, Emerald Group Publishing Limited