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Health implications of job-related stress, motivation and satisfaction in higher education faculty and administrators

Denelle Mohammed (Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA)
Edrea Chan (Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA)
Rezwan Ahmad (Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA)
Aleksandar Dusic (Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA)
Cheryl Boglarsky (University of Detroit Mercy, Detroit, Michigan, USA)
Patrick Blessinger (Office of Executive Director, HETL Association, Kew Gardens, New York, USA) (School of Education, St John’s University, Queens, New York, USA)
Rana Zeine (Department of Medical Sciences, Saint James School of Medicine, Park Ridge, Illinois, USA)

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education

ISSN: 2050-7003

Article publication date: 31 December 2019

Issue publication date: 15 December 2020

1040

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze job-related stress, motivation and satisfaction in higher education institutions, and assesses their implications on health in various industries including higher education. In total, 52 higher education faculty and administrators from institutions in more than 16 countries participated in the study that utilized the organizational surveys, Organizational Effectiveness Inventory® from human synergistics. Subgroup analysis was done to compare faculty and administrators; males to females, private, public, for-profit and not-for-profit institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess health implications, 160 respondents employed in seven industries were surveyed using a custom medical/stress questionnaire to collect self-reported data on levels of job-related stress, motivation and satisfaction as well as the presence of several medical conditions, including myocardial infarction, stroke, angina pectoris/coronary heart disease, hypertension, gastro-esophageal reflux disease and diabetes mellitus. The results from each of the two surveys were statistically analyzed separately.

Findings

Results show undesirable levels of job-related stress, motivation and satisfaction in some segments of higher education employees; as well as associations between poorer health and high stress levels. The study established a potential justification consequently, the authors recommend organizational offerings of: stress relief programs; health fairs and health club memberships; stress management workshops; use of mobile apps for stress relief; job description reviews to eliminate work-related demands; changes to managerial styles that align with the culture of employees; re-evaluation of organizational structure; and enhanced communication amongst workplace management and employees.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include small sample sizes and the presence of confounding factors that were not considered. In addition, this study did not look into whether occupational position or occupational difficulty compromised the nature of work causing employees to experience lower levels of satisfaction, since the extent to which employees feel satisfied with their work may influence their physical well-being.

Originality/value

There are a number of factors that can affect employees with regards to medical illnesses in a job-related setting. There are three factors in particular that have been shown to negatively affect the health of employees: job-related stress; motivation; and satisfaction. These effects have not been studied in depth in faculty and administrators of higher education institutions, hence this study seeks to achieve that.

Keywords

Citation

Mohammed, D., Chan, E., Ahmad, R., Dusic, A., Boglarsky, C., Blessinger, P. and Zeine, R. (2020), "Health implications of job-related stress, motivation and satisfaction in higher education faculty and administrators", Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, Vol. 12 No. 4, pp. 725-741. https://doi.org/10.1108/JARHE-04-2018-0056

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

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