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Family−school conflict and self-regulation among diverse women in higher education

Jinyoung Koh (Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA)
Susan P. Farruggia (Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA)
Nicole Perez (Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA)
Julienne Palbusa (Office of the President, University of California, Oakland, California, USA)

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education

ISSN: 2050-7003

Article publication date: 10 August 2021

Issue publication date: 2 January 2023

61

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated whether family−school conflict, directly and indirectly, predicts behavioral regulatory strategies (via emotion regulation) among women in higher education. The authors aim to hypothesize that the direct and indirect effects would vary by race/ethnicity.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 1,872 incoming first-year female students from a large, racially/ethnically diverse urban public university. They were classified into four racial/ethnic groups: 22% Asian American (n = 403), 11% Black (n = 209), 46% Latina (n = 865), and 21% White (n = 395). Data were collected from institutional records and an online student pre-matriculation survey. Multigroup structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to explore the structural relations among key variables.

Findings

Family−school conflict was negatively associated with help-seeking in all racial/ethnic groups, whereas family−school conflict was negatively associated with time management only for Latina students. In addition, family−school conflict indirectly predicted time management and help-seeking through increased emotion regulation, particularly among Latina students.

Originality/value

In considering racial heterogeneity, the results showed the importance of analyzing racial/ethnic groups separately to obtain more accurate information on self-regulation mechanisms in family−school conflict contexts.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge grant funding from an anonymous foundation. The authors also would like to thank Tom Moss for providing support for this project.

Citation

Koh, J., Farruggia, S.P., Perez, N. and Palbusa, J. (2023), "Family−school conflict and self-regulation among diverse women in higher education", Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, Vol. 15 No. 1, pp. 51-65. https://doi.org/10.1108/JARHE-01-2021-0039

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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