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Agricultural mechanization in Ethiopia: hiring service transactions, mechanization clusters and land consolidation

Yared Deribe Tefera (Agricultural Economics, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Melkassa Agricultural Research Center, Adama, Ethiopia)
Bisrat Getnet Awoke (Agricultural Engineering, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies

ISSN: 2044-0839

Article publication date: 31 May 2023

160

Abstract

Purpose

Agriculture in Ethiopia relies heavily on traditional farm power sources and is designated by the lowest farm machinery access, in contrast to other Sub-Sahara African (SSA) countries. The purpose of this research is to analyze the heterogeneity of mechanization service transactions and factors determining farmers' cooperation in mechanization clusters and willingness to accept land consolidation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of producer households in major crop production areas in the Oromia, SNNPR, Amhara and Tigray regions. The sampling design involved three stages: districts were selected using a stratified sampling approach accompanied by simple random samples of kebele units and producer households in the second and final stages, respectively.

Findings

This study’s results show that mechanization service costs, service relationships, clustering and land consolidation exhibit significant heterogeneity across the study areas. Cluster farming was found to be advantageous against diseconomies, rationalized by upgrading the mechanization scale. The probit model parameterization of the probability distributions reveals that household, land, crop, mechanization service, remoteness and location-related factors determine participation in mechanization clusters and willingness to accept land consolidation.

Research limitations/implications

Fostering cooperation by focusing on constraints and demand of users is suggested to reduce transaction costs and expand hired mechanization services to unaddressed areas. The findings are relevant to most SSA countries where mechanization development is hampered by land fragmentation.

Originality/value

Limited information is available on agricultural mechanization development for smallholder farmers, particularly in Ethiopia, and this study adds empirical evidence about the synergy between cluster farming and mechanization, horizontal coordination and alternative supply models.

Keywords

Citation

Tefera, Y.D. and Awoke, B.G. (2023), "Agricultural mechanization in Ethiopia: hiring service transactions, mechanization clusters and land consolidation", Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/JADEE-06-2022-0127

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2023, Emerald Publishing Limited

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