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Does crop specialization improve agricultural productivity and commercialization? Insight from the Northern Savannah Ecological Zone of Ghana

Samuel Sekyi (Department of Economics, SD Dombo University of Business and Integrated Development Studies, Wa, Ghana)
Christopher Quaidoo (University of Professional Studies, Accra, Ghana)
Emmanuel Agyapong Wiafe (Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, Accra, Ghana)

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies

ISSN: 2044-0839

Article publication date: 29 July 2021

Issue publication date: 20 January 2023

284

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the effects of crop specialization on agricultural productivity and commercialization for farmers who produce high-value crops in the Northern Savannah Ecological Zone of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the USAID/Ghana Feed the Future (FTF) survey, which collected data on high-value crops (i.e. maize, rice and soya). Data for the analysis consists of 2,903 farm households. The study utilized the three-stage generalized method of moment estimation technique to deal with the potential endogeneity of crop specialization within the context of productivity and commercialization and heteroscedasticity issues in the data.

Findings

The study found that crop specialization positively relates to agricultural productivity and commercialization, suggesting that increased crop specialization in the production of high-value stimulates productivity and opens market opportunities for farm households. These findings imply that crop specialization seems more beneficial to farmers as it significantly improves productivity and commercialization.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in the Northern Savannah Ecological Zone of Ghana and not the entire country.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first to have jointly modeled crop specialization, agricultural productivity and commercialization. The main advantage of using this system approach is that it uses more information, thereby providing more precise parameter estimates.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to USAID and Monitoring Evaluation and Technical Support Services for allowing us to use the Feed the Future baseline dataset for Ghana.

Financial Disclosure: This research received no specific grant from any funding agency, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

Disclosure statement: No potential conflict of interest was reported by the authors.

Conflicts of interest: None

Citation

Sekyi, S., Quaidoo, C. and Wiafe, E.A. (2023), "Does crop specialization improve agricultural productivity and commercialization? Insight from the Northern Savannah Ecological Zone of Ghana", Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, Vol. 13 No. 1, pp. 16-35. https://doi.org/10.1108/JADEE-01-2021-0021

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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