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Surviving intimate partner violence and disaster

Clare E.B. Cannon (Department of Human Ecology, University of California Davis, Davis, California, USA and Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa)
Regardt Ferreira (Tulane University School of Social Work, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA and Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa)
Fredrick Buttell (Tulane University School of Social Work, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA and Department of Social Work, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa)
Allyson O'Connor (Tulane University School of Social Work, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA)

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research

ISSN: 1759-6599

Article publication date: 26 May 2022

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Abstract

Purpose

Few studies investigating disaster have examined the risks associated with surviving both disaster and intimate partner violence (IPV). IPV is psychological or physical abuse in a personal relationship. Using an intersectional approach, the purpose of this study is to investigate contributions to and differences in perceived stress and personal resilience during the COVID-19 pandemic among a sample of predominantly female-identified IPV survivors (n = 41) to examine risks associated with this vulnerable population during disaster.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured interview guide, IPV survivors were interviewed regarding their perceived stress (i.e. perceived stress scale), personal resilience, (i.e. Connor Davidson Resilience Scale), type of violence experienced (i.e. physical violence), COVID-19-related stressors (i.e. loss of income due to the pandemic) and relevant socio-demographic characteristics (i.e. race).

Findings

These interviews indicate that participants exhibited low levels of resilience and a moderate amount of stress exposure highlighting risk factors associated with experiencing personal violence during disaster.

Originality/value

At the height of their need for support and assistance, the disaster generated additional rent and nutritional stress compounding the pressures violence survivors face. These findings suggest those who are socially vulnerable due to violence need structural support services to cope with disaster and violence-related stresses.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Disclosure statement: The authors report there are no competing interests to declare.

Citation

Cannon, C.E.B., Ferreira, R., Buttell, F. and O'Connor, A. (2022), "Surviving intimate partner violence and disaster", Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/JACPR-03-2022-0702

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

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