Bring Your Own Devices classroom

Janak Adhikari (School of Science, Technology and Engineering, Open Polytechnic of New Zealand, Wellington, New Zealand)
Anuradha Mathrani (Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand)
Chris Scogings (Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand)

Interactive Technology and Smart Education

ISSN: 1741-5659

Publication date: 21 November 2016

Abstract

Purpose

Over the past few years, technology-mediated learning has established itself as a valuable pathway towards learners’ academic and social development. However, within the adoption stages of information and communications technology-enabled education, further questions have been raised in terms of equity of information literacy and learning outcomes. For the past three years, the authors have been working with one of the earliest secondary schools in New Zealand to introduce a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy. In this paper, the authors present the findings of a longitudinal investigation into the BYOD project, which offers new insights into the digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an empirically grounded longitudinal case research conducted over a three-year period in one secondary school in New Zealand. This research has included a number of methods, including surveys, interviews and classroom observations, to gather qualitative data from various stakeholders (teachers, students and parents).

Findings

The findings from the study of the BYOD project inform of digital divide issues in the context of evolving teaching and learning practices across formal and informal spaces. The authors explored how the BYOD policy has influenced existing divides in the learning process across three levels, namely, digital access, digital capability and digital outcome. The result sheds light on key issues affecting the learning process to contextualise factors in the three-level digital divide for the BYOD technology adoption process in classroom settings.

Research limitations/implications

The study presents findings from an ongoing investigation of one secondary school, an early adopter of the BYOD policy. While the authors have followed the school for three years, more in-depth studies on how teaching and learning practices are evolving across formal and informal spaces will be further qualified in the next stages of data collection.

Originality/value

The study contributes to new knowledge on how digital inclusion can be supported beyond mere access to meaningful use of technology to reinforce student learning and their overall skill development.

Keywords

Citation

Adhikari, J., Mathrani, A. and Scogings, C. (2016), "Bring Your Own Devices classroom", Interactive Technology and Smart Education, Vol. 13 No. 4, pp. 323-343. https://doi.org/10.1108/ITSE-04-2016-0007

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2016, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Please note you might not have access to this content

You may be able to access this content by login via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
If you would like to contact us about accessing this content, click the button and fill out the form.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.