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Looking behind eye-catching design: an eye-tracking study on wine bottle design preference

Peter Merdian (Department of Marketing and Human Resource Management, Ludwigshafen University of Business and Society, Ludwigshafen on the Rhine, Germany)
Philipp Piroth (Department of Marketing and Human Resource Management, Ludwigshafen University of Business and Society, Ludwigshafen on the Rhine, Germany)
Edith Rueger-Muck (Department of Marketing and Human Resource Management, Ludwigshafen University of Business and Society, Ludwigshafen on the Rhine, Germany)
Gerhard Raab (Department of Marketing and Human Resource Management, Ludwigshafen University of Business and Society, Ludwigshafen on the Rhine, Germany)

International Journal of Wine Business Research

ISSN: 1751-1062

Article publication date: 6 October 2020

Issue publication date: 4 February 2021

640

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to find out how unconscious perception and conscious reactions differ when it comes to evaluate wine bottles in a shopping shelf. It was evaluated how attention is related to subjective evaluations of interest and value in the perception of wine bottle design choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The experiment combined implicit eye-tracking observations and a quantitative measurement on the assessment on wine bottle designs. In total, 37 participants rated eight different wine bottle designs based on their interest and assumed value, without any given information about the wines’ original price classification.

Findings

There is a significant difference between the perception of wine bottle designs. Eye-catchy designs do not automatically transform into a higher perception of value and interest towards the product. The unconscious perception of bottles and the conscious reaction differentiate.

Research limitations/implications

The greatest limitation, as with many other implicit studies, is the limited number of subjects and the associated limited validity. In addition, eight bottles in four categories were studied, which is adequate, but does not fully reflect the complexity of the wine market supply.

Practical implications

Manufacturers and wine label designers should challenge existing pre-disposition towards certain wine bottle design choices.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first German consumer study that focusses on unconscious perception (measured by implicit eye movement behaviour) and conscious reactions in the context of explicit value and interest evaluation.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Funding: Funding was provided by the “Forschungsring des Deutschen Weinbaus (FDW)”. Translated: Research Group of German Wine Industry

Citation

Merdian, P., Piroth, P., Rueger-Muck, E. and Raab, G. (2021), "Looking behind eye-catching design: an eye-tracking study on wine bottle design preference", International Journal of Wine Business Research, Vol. 33 No. 1, pp. 134-151. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJWBR-07-2019-0044

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited

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