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A methodological framework for ascertaining the social capital of environmental community organisations in urban Australia

Subas P. Dhakal (Collaborative Research Network, Southern Cross University, Bilinga, Australia)

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy

ISSN: 0144-333X

Article publication date: 7 October 2014

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the level of social capital in environmental community organisations (ECOs) in Perth, Western Australia. On a general level, social capital in ECOs is understood as intra-organisational and inter-organisational relationships that organisations maintain through interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises quantitative (i.e. survey) as well as qualitative (i.e. interviews) approaches to data collection and analysis. It proposes a methodological framework to measure the level of social capital, and explores the association between the ascertained level of social capital and organisational capabilities.

Findings

The results of the survey and interviews reveal that while the level of social capital is needs based, maintaining a higher intensity of organisational relationships puts ECOs in a better position to do more with less.

Research limitations/implications

The findings advance the task of ascertaining the level of social capital in ECOs from organisational interactions perspective.

Originality/value

This paper captures a community organisation-specific methodological framework to measure and analyse social capital.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

This research was partly funded by the Australian CRC for Interaction Design and Murdoch University. The preparation of this manuscript was supported by the Commonwealth's Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) Programme at Southern Cross University.

Citation

P. Dhakal, S. (2014), "A methodological framework for ascertaining the social capital of environmental community organisations in urban Australia", International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Vol. 34 No. 11/12, pp. 730-746. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJSSP-12-2013-0124

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited