To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

An experimental examination of consumer attitudes, behavioral intentions, and information search behavior after viewing a predictive genetic test direct‐to‐consumer advertisement

Brent Rollins (PCOM‐GA Campus School of Pharmacy, Suwanee, Georgia, USA)
Shravanan Ramakrishnan (Medical Marketing Economics, Oxford, Mississippi, USA)
Matthew Perri (University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA)

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing

ISSN: 1750-6123

Article publication date: 30 August 2013

1376

Abstract

Purpose

Predictive genetic tests (PGTs) have greatly increased their presence in the market, and, much like their pharmaceutical peers, companies offering PGTs have increasingly used direct‐to‐consumer advertising as part of their promotional strategy. Given many PGTs are available without a prescription or physician order and the lack of empirical research examining the effects of PGT‐DTC, this paper seeks to examine consumer attitudes, intentions, and behavior in response to a PGT‐DTC ad with and without a prescription requirement.

Design/methodology/approach

A single factor, between subjects online survey design with the presence or absence of a prescription requirement as the experimental variable was used to evaluate consumers' attitudes, intentions, and behavior in response to a predictive genetic test DTC advertisement. A minimum sample size of 198 was determined a priori and 206 surveys were completed within five hours of deployment to 600 randomly selected general consumer participants for a response rate of 34.3 percent (206/600), with 106 in the prescription requirement group and 100 in the non‐prescription group. Descriptive statistics, t‐tests, and chi‐square techniques were used to examine the various dependent variables (consumer attitudes, behavioral intentions, and the pre‐defined behavior measure) and their differences.

Findings

Overall, consumers hold favorable attitudes to PGT‐DTC ads, but did not intend to engage in physician discussion, take the test or perform information search behavior. The effect of a prescription requirement was not significant, as no differences were seen with the attitude and behavioral intention dependent variables.

Originality/value

At this still relatively young point in the PGT cycle, consumers still seem to be skeptical about the value of predictive genetic tests and their associated DTC advertisements.

Keywords

Citation

Rollins, B., Ramakrishnan, S. and Perri, M. (2013), "An experimental examination of consumer attitudes, behavioral intentions, and information search behavior after viewing a predictive genetic test direct‐to‐consumer advertisement", International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, Vol. 7 No. 3, pp. 285-295. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJPHM-09-2012-0003

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Related articles