Addressing excess risk of overdose among recently incarcerated people in the USA: harm reduction interventions in correctional settings

Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein (Department of Social Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA) (Center for Health Equity Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA)
David H. Cloud (Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA) (Vera Institute of Justice, Substance Use and Mental Health Program, New York City, New York, USA)
Chelsea Davis (Vera Institute of Justice, Substance Use and Mental Health Program, New York City, New York, USA)
Nickolas Zaller (Department of Health Behavior and Health Sciences, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA)
Ayesha Delany-Brumsey (Vera Institute of Justice, Substance Use and Mental Health Program, New York City, New York, USA)
Leah Pope (Vera Institute of Justice, Substance Use and Mental Health Program, New York City, New York, USA)
Sarah Martino (Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA)
Benjamin Bouvier (Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA)
Josiah Rich (Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights, Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA)

International Journal of Prisoner Health

ISSN: 1744-9200

Publication date: 13 March 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss overdose among those with criminal justice experience and recommend harm reduction strategies to lessen overdose risk among this vulnerable population.

Design/methodology/approach

Strategies are needed to reduce overdose deaths among those with recent incarceration. Jails and prisons are at the epicenter of the opioid epidemic but are a largely untapped setting for implementing overdose education, risk assessment, medication assisted treatment, and naloxone distribution programs. Federal, state, and local plans commonly lack corrections as an ingredient in combating overdose. Harm reduction strategies are vital for reducing the risk of overdose in the post-release community.

Findings

Therefore, the authors recommend that the following be implemented in correctional settings: expansion of overdose education and naloxone programs; establishment of comprehensive medication assisted treatment programs as standard of care; development of corrections-specific overdose risk assessment tools; and increased collaboration between corrections entities and community-based organizations.

Originality/value

In this policy brief the authors provide recommendations for implementing harm reduction approaches in criminal justice settings. Adoption of these strategies could reduce the number of overdoses among those with recent criminal justice involvement.

Keywords

Citation

Brinkley-Rubinstein, L., Cloud, D., Davis, C., Zaller, N., Delany-Brumsey, A., Pope, L., Martino, S., Bouvier, B. and Rich, J. (2017), "Addressing excess risk of overdose among recently incarcerated people in the USA: harm reduction interventions in correctional settings", International Journal of Prisoner Health, Vol. 13 No. 1, pp. 25-31. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJPH-08-2016-0039

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Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited

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