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COVID-19 and overconfidence bias: the case of developed, emerging and frontier markets

Vijay Kumar Shrotryia (Department of Commerce, Faculty of Commerce and Business, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India)
Himanshi Kalra (Department of Commerce, Faculty of Commerce and Business, Delhi School of Economics, University of Delhi, New Delhi, India)

International Journal of Emerging Markets

ISSN: 1746-8809

Article publication date: 13 May 2021

448

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the present study is to delve into the overconfidence bias in global stock markets during both pre COVID-19 and COVID-19 phases.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study makes use of daily adjusted closing prices and volume of the broad market indices of 46 global stock markets over a period ranging from July 2015 till June 2020. The sample period is split into pre COVID-19 and COVID-19 phases. In order to test the overconfidence fallacy in the chosen stock markets, bivariate market-wide vector auto regression (VAR) models and impulse response functions (IRFs) have been employed in both phases.

Findings

A highly significant contemporaneous relationship between market return and volume appears to be more pronounced in the Japanese, US, Chinese and Vietnamese stock markets in the pre COVID-19 era for the relevant coefficients are positive and highly significant for most lags. Coming to the period of turbulence, the present study discovers strong overconfident behavior in the Chinese, Taiwanese, Turkish, Jordanian and Vietnamese stock markets during COVID-19 phase.

Practical implications

A stark finding is that none of the developed stock markets reveal strong overconfidence bias during pandemic, suggesting a loss or decline in the investors' confidence. Therefore, the regulators should try to regain the investors' trust and confidence in the markets by ensuring honest, fair and transparent practices. The money managers should reduce the transaction cost to encourage trading and educate investors to hold a well-diversified portfolio to mitigate risk in the long run. The governments may launch recovery packages focusing on sustaining and improving economic activities. Finally, a better investment culture may be built by the corporate houses through good corporate governance practices to regain lost trust.

Originality/value

The present study appears to be the very first attempt to gauge overconfidence bias in the wake of a recent COVID-19 pandemic.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the editor(s) and reviewer(s) for their constructive feedback. No funding has been availed to carry out this research study.

Citation

Shrotryia, V.K. and Kalra, H. (2021), "COVID-19 and overconfidence bias: the case of developed, emerging and frontier markets", International Journal of Emerging Markets, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOEM-09-2020-1019

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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