Preparing teachers to mentor beginning teachers: an Australian case study

Denise Beutel (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Leanne Crosswell (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Jill Willis (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Rebecca Spooner-Lane (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Elizabeth Curtis (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Peter Churchward (Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education

ISSN: 2046-6854

Publication date: 4 September 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to present an Australian mentor preparation program designed to prepare experienced teachers to mentor beginning teachers and second, to identify and discuss mentor teachers’ personal and professional outcomes and the wider contextual implications emerging from the Mentoring Beginning Teachers (MBT) mentor preparation program.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study, situated within Queensland, Australia, draws on qualitative data collected via interviews and focus groups with mentor teachers who participated in a large-scale systemic mentor preparation program. The program positions mentoring as supportive, based on a process of collaborative inquiry and encouraging critically reflexive praxis with the mentor professional learning focusing on reflection, dialog and criticality.

Findings

Initial findings show the outcomes of the mentor preparation program include building a common language and shared understanding around the role of mentor, consolidating a collaborative inquiry approach to mentoring and providing opportunity for self-reflection and critique around mentoring approaches and practices. Some findings, such as a greater self-awareness and validation of mentors’ own teaching performance, have confirmed previous research. However, the originality of this research lies in the personal and professional impacts for mentor teachers and the wider contextual impacts that have emerged from the study.

Practical implications

The study highlights the impact of the mentor preparation program on the professional learning of teacher-mentors and contributes to the current lack of empirical research that identifies the personal and professional impacts for mentors and the wider contextual factors that impact effective mentoring in schools.

Originality/value

The originality of this research lies in the personal and professional impacts for mentor teachers and the wider contextual impacts more broadly that have emerged from the study.

Keywords

Citation

Beutel, D., Crosswell, L., Willis, J., Spooner-Lane, R., Curtis, E. and Churchward, P. (2017), "Preparing teachers to mentor beginning teachers: an Australian case study", International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, Vol. 6 No. 3, pp. 164-177. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJMCE-04-2017-0030

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited

Please note you might not have access to this content

You may be able to access this content by login via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
If you would like to contact us about accessing this content, click the button and fill out the form.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.