Suicide rates for different religious groups in the South Asian origin population in England and Wales: a secondary analysis of a national data set

Andrew Tuck (Research Coordinator, Clinical Health Equity, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada)
Kamaldeep Bhui (Professor of Cultural Psychiatry & Epidemiology, Centre for Psychiatry at the Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine Barts, London, UK and The London School of Medicine & Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK)
Kiran Nanchahal (Senior Lecturer in Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Department of Social & Environmental Health Research, Faculty of Public Health & Policy, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK)
Kwame McKenzie (Professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Canada and Senior Scientist, Director of Health Equity and Director of Social Aetiology and Mental Health CIHR Training Program, Clinical Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada)

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare

ISSN: 2056-4902

Publication date: 21 December 2015

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to calculate the rate of suicide in different religious groups in people of South Asian origin in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of a national data set. A name recognition algorithm was used to identify people of South Asian origin and their religion. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated using this data and data from the national census. Setting: a population study of all those who died by suicide in England and Wales in 2001. Participants: all cases of suicide and undetermined intent identified by the Office for National Statistics for England and Wales.

Findings

There were 4,848 suicides in the UK in 2001 of which 125 (2.6 percent) were identified as people of South Asian origin by the algorithm. The suicide rate for all people of South Asian origin was 5.50/100,000 compared to 9.31/100,000 for the population of England and Wales. The age SMR for those whose names were of Hindu, Muslim or Sikh origin were 0.88, 0.47 and 0.85, respectively. Female South Asians have lower rates of suicide, than their South Asian male counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

Religious classification by the computerized program does not guarantee religious affiliation. The data set were confined to one year because religion was not collected prior to the 2001 census.

Originality/value

The rates of suicide for South Asian sub-populations in the UK differ by gender and religion.

Keywords

Citation

Tuck, A., Bhui, K., Nanchahal, K. and McKenzie, K. (2015), "Suicide rates for different religious groups in the South Asian origin population in England and Wales: a secondary analysis of a national data set", International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, Vol. 8 No. 4, pp. 260-266. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJHRH-09-2013-0019

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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