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Participation in decision making: a case study of job satisfaction and commitment (part three)

Steven H. Appelbaum (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)
Damien Louis (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)
Dmitry Makarenko (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)
Jasleena Saluja (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)
Olga Meleshko (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)
Sevag Kulbashian (John Molson School of Business, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada)

Industrial and Commercial Training

ISSN: 0019-7858

Article publication date: 30 September 2013

Abstract

Purpose

When employees believe in and trust their management, it motivates and encourages employees' participation in decision making which improves employees' efforts, benefits their job satisfaction and commitment to work. All of these factors, in turn, contribute to a trustworthy manager-employee relationship. While the literature supports this premise, there is little empirical evidence that patterns of causal inference in the relationship are clearly understood. This three-part empirical case seeks to focus on studying the relations between employee trust in management in a Quebec manufacturing company and their job satisfaction, intention to quit, level of employee participation in decision making and their commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical case will test five hypotheses regarding seven variables influencing the level of employee engagement and commitment, employee turnover, employee participation in decision-making processes and job satisfaction.

Findings

The article finds that employee trust in management is an important determinant of their willingness to participate in decision making. Insufficient employee participation in decision making in turn leads to low level of employee job satisfaction and employee commitment. Lack of employee commitment and engagement affects the employee's intention to quit.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of the office workers was not sufficient in order to have statistically significant results of the correlations between the variables for the production department employees and for the office/administrative staff. This could have helped to determine the level of internal communication specifically, but also the level of all of the other variables for the two different groups of employees.

Practical implications

This article offers useful insights for management in relation to strengthening interpersonal trust within an organization, introducing employee empowerment practices and increasing employee job satisfaction and commitment.

Originality/value

The findings provide empirical evidence to support theoretical models that link employee trust in management, participation in decision making, job satisfaction, commitment, and turnover intentions and highlight the impact of these factors on organizational performance.

Keywords

Citation

H. Appelbaum, S., Louis, D., Makarenko, D., Saluja, J., Meleshko, O. and Kulbashian, S. (2013), "Participation in decision making: a case study of job satisfaction and commitment (part three)", Industrial and Commercial Training, Vol. 45 No. 7, pp. 412-419. https://doi.org/10.1108/ICT-09-2012-0049

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited