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Developing non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) through building design

Alistair Thomas Matthew Marsh (School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK)
Naufan Ashraf Jahja (Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, UK)
Fiona Gleed (Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, UK)
Oliver Peacock (Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK)
David Coley (Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, UK)
Ricardo Codinhoto (Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, Bath, UK)

Facilities

ISSN: 0263-2772

Article publication date: 28 June 2022

Issue publication date: 19 July 2022

39

Abstract

Purpose

Physical inactivity has a considerable negative impact on health. Physical activity has reduced partly due to workplace and lifestyle changes, causing people to spend more time in buildings and increasing sedentary behaviour. The purpose of this paper is to address a largely untapped opportunity for designers and managers to improve building users’ health by designing buildings that raise users’ Non-Exercise Activity Thermogenesis (NEAT) levels. In this research a conceptual model was developed to assess buildings’ performance in providing NEAT-promoting opportunities through building design features and management, in relation to building users’ propensity for NEAT behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model was developed by a multi-disciplinary team of researchers and data to populate the model was obtained through a survey of 75 buildings in Jakarta (Indonesia).

Findings

The presented proof-of-concept shows that the model’s “meso-scale” approach to study physical activity and building design can lead to potential improvements of NEAT levels and physical activity in buildings.

Originality/value

The review of precedent models shows that this subject has been researched at micro-scale (i.e. detailed monitoring of individuals’ movement) and macro-scale (i.e. epidemiological studies of populations’ health). The presented model is original, as it explores a “meso-scale”(i.e. building scale) that is unique.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

This study has been anonymised for peer-review.Funding details: Anonymised for peer-review.Disclosure statement: No potential conflict of interest is reported by the authors.Data availability statement: Anonymised for peer-review.

Citation

Marsh, A.T.M., Jahja, N.A., Gleed, F., Peacock, O., Coley, D. and Codinhoto, R. (2022), "Developing non-exercise activity thermogenesis (NEAT) through building design", Facilities, Vol. 40 No. 11/12, pp. 737-756. https://doi.org/10.1108/F-01-2022-0002

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

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