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Antecedents of perceived overqualification: a three-wave study

Laura Guerrero (Marketing & Management, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas, USA)
John-Paul Hatala (Career and Work Counsellor Program, George Brown College, Toronto, Canada)

Career Development International

ISSN: 1362-0436

Article publication date: 10 August 2015

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of job search on perceived overqualification by applying the theory of planned behavior and including financial need and openness to experience as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

Three questionnaires were given at weeks 1, 8 and 12 to 436 practice firm participants. A total of 119 completed all three questionnaires. The authors used partial least squares to analyze the data.

Findings

Job search self-efficacy was positively related to job search intentions and to outcome expectations. Job search intentions were positively related to job search intensity. Financial need acted as a moderator of the relationship between job search intensity and perceived overqualification such that for those with high-financial need higher levels of job search intensity resulted in higher perceived overqualification.

Research limitations/implications

The authors found little support for the theory of planned behavior in the model. The authors found strong support for the role of job search self-efficacy and job search intentions. The use of a three-wave design resulted in a relatively low sample size and the use of the practice firm reduces the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The results suggest that increasing job search self-efficacy and job search intentions while managing the anticipations of job seekers is likely to yield better job search outcomes.

Originality/value

This study investigates the role of job search on perceived overqualification. Findings suggest that malleable attitudes during job search such as job search self-efficacy, job search intentions, and anticipations are likely to impact perceived overqualification.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

For their assistance in collecting this data, the authors wish to thank Deborah Tracy and her colleagues. For their helpful feedback, the authors wish to thank Esperanza Huerta, Fernanda Wagstaff, Fernando Jiménez, Mishaw Cuyler, Saúl Valdiviezo, and Michelle Ruiz.

Citation

Guerrero, L. and Hatala, J.-P. (2015), "Antecedents of perceived overqualification: a three-wave study", Career Development International, Vol. 20 No. 4, pp. 409-423. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-11-2014-0152

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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