To read this content please select one of the options below:

Acceptance of in vitro meat and the role of food technology neophobia, dietary patterns and information – Empirical evidence for Germany

Anna Katharina Heidmeier (Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Management, Institute for Agricultural Policy and Market Research, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany)
Ramona Teuber (Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Nutritional Sciences and Environmental Management, Institute for Agricultural Policy and Market Research, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 27 December 2022

14

Abstract

Purpose

The present study addresses acceptance of in vitro meat (IVM) among a predominantly student sample in Germany. It is investigated to which extent food technology neophobia, the currently followed diet and information treatments impact acceptance of IVM measured via the construct willingness to buy (WTB).

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative online-survey was conducted in August 2020 using a between-subject design with three different information treatments and one control group. Moreover, the Food Technology Neophobia (FTN) scale was employed, For the statistical analysis, the χ2 and Kruskal–Wallis test were used. Additionally, a binary logit model was specified and estimated in order to investigate the determinants of willingness to buy IVM accounting for the effects of gender, age, vegetarianism/veganism, FTN, prior knowledge, information treatments and potential interaction effects.

Findings

Participants following a vegan or vegetarian diet exhibit a lower likelihood of IVM acceptance in comparison to participants following an omnivore diet. However, a considerable share of vegan and vegetarian participants expressed a positive WTB. Moreover, an increasing FTN score (i.e. an increase in food technology neophobia) goes along with a reduced likelihood of acceptance, while all three information treatments increase acceptance in comparison to the control group. The largest effect on acceptance could be found for the environmental benefit treatment.

Practical implications

The findings show that especially among a young and highly educated sample the stressing of environmental benefits of IVM has a substantial impact on acceptance. This might be taken up in information and marketing campaigns once the product becomes available on the European market.

Originality/value

So far the empirical evidence on German consumers' acceptance of IVM is scarce. The present study addressed this research gap by focusing on a young sample with a high percentage of vegetarians and vegans and analyzing the role of food technology neophobia and different information treatments in a between-subject design.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Ramona Teuber acknowledges funding from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) from funds of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation (BMZ), SDGnexus Network (Grant Number 57526248), program “exceed—Hochschulexzellenz in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit” and from the Hessian Ministry of the Environment, Climate Protection, Agriculture and Consumer Protection within the GreenDairy project.

Citation

Heidmeier, A.K. and Teuber, R. (2022), "Acceptance of in vitro meat and the role of food technology neophobia, dietary patterns and information – Empirical evidence for Germany", British Food Journal, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-03-2022-0244

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited

Related articles