Corn starch dextrin changes intestinal microbiota and its metabolic activity in rats fed a basal and high-fat diet

Renata Barczynska (Institute of Chemistry, Health and Food Sciences, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa, Poland)
Adam Jurgoński (Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lublin, Poland)
Katarzyna Slizewska (Institute of Fermentation Technology and Microbiology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Lodz University of Technology, Lodz, Poland)
Jerzy Juśkiewicz (Division of Food Science, Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lublin, Poland)
Janusz Kapusniak (Institute of Chemistry, Health and Food Sciences, Jan Dlugosz University, Czestochowa, Poland)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Publication date: 2 September 2019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the influence of low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin obtained from corn starch on the numbers and relative proportions of enteric bacteria Bacteroidetes (Bacteroides, Prevotella), Actinobacteria (Bifidobacterium) and Firmicutes (Clostridium, Lactobacillus). Moreover, basic indicators of gastrointestinal function (among other things: epidydymal fat mass, mass with contents, pH in the colon, cecum, small intestine, fecal enzymes were investigation) and short-chain fatty acids are analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

In vivo experimental studies in rats (analized samples of the ileal, cecal and colonic digesta; pH; blood serum; fecal enzymes); determination of the number of bacteria – fluorescence in situ hybridization; and determination of type and concentration SCFA – HPLC were considered.

Findings

No statistically significant differences in final body weight were found between rats fed low-fat and high-fat diets supplemented with dextrin. In rats fed the low-fat diet with dextrin, the gut microbiota composition was as follows: 42.74 percent Bacteroises and Prevotella (Bacteroidetes), 35.28 percent Clostridium and Lactobacilllus (Firmicutes) and 21.98 percent Bifidobacterium (Actinobacteria), while in rats fed the high-fat diet with dextrin it was similar. Irrespective of the diet type, supplementation with dextrin enhances bacterial glycolytic activity and the cecal production of total SCFAs, with strongly increased propionate and decreased butyrate fermentation.

Practical implications

Dextrin may enrich food or be a component of functional foods.

Originality/value

Dextrin from corn starch may contribute to changes in the composition of intestinal microbiota.

Keywords

Citation

Barczynska, R., Jurgoński, A., Slizewska, K., Juśkiewicz, J. and Kapusniak, J. (2019), "Corn starch dextrin changes intestinal microbiota and its metabolic activity in rats fed a basal and high-fat diet", British Food Journal, Vol. 121 No. 9, pp. 2219-2232. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-02-2019-0083

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

Please note you might not have access to this content

You may be able to access this content by login via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
If you would like to contact us about accessing this content, click the button and fill out the form.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.