The case for guided self-help for people with intellectual disabilities

Eddie Chaplin (Department of Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, London South Bank University, London, UK)
Karina Marshall-Tate (Estia Centre, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

ISSN: 2044-1282

Publication date: 2 May 2017

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine guided self-help (GSH), and some of the barriers as to why it is not routinely available for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper offers an overview of GSH and the potential benefits of it as an intervention for people with ID with mild depression and/or anxiety.

Findings

The current literature reports the successful use and effectiveness of GSH in the general population. However, despite this there is little evidence that it is being used in practice for people with ID.

Originality/value

This paper offers an overview of GSH and advocates for its increasing use for people with ID to help bring about equality in mental healthcare.

Keywords

Citation

Chaplin, E. and Marshall-Tate, K. (2017), "The case for guided self-help for people with intellectual disabilities", Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 11 No. 3, pp. 126-130. https://doi.org/10.1108/AMHID-10-2016-0030

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Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2017, Emerald Publishing Limited

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