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Complex Behaviour Service: enhanced model for challenging behaviour

Sophie Inchley-Mort (Researcher, based at Camden Learning Disabilities Service, Camden & Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Khadija Rantell (Honorary Research Fellow, based at JRO Communications, Joint Research Office (Part of the Research Support Centre), University College London, London, UK)
Charlotte Wahlich (Research Assistant, based at Camden Learning Disabilities Service, Camden & Islington NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Angela Hassiotis (Mental Health Sciences Unit, University College London, London, UK)

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

ISSN: 2044-1282

Article publication date: 2 July 2014

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Abstract

Purpose

Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) is thought to be an important model for working with people with intellectual disabilities who display behaviours challenging to service. The purpose of this paper is to explore clinical and service user outcomes associated with the delivery of PBS by a Complex Behaviour Service (CBS).

Design/methodology/approach

Clinical outcomes of 24 service users treated by the CBS team were assessed at baseline, six and 12 months and compared with those of 22 peers who received usual care. The main outcome was reduction in challenging behaviour measured by the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist (ABC). Secondary outcomes included measures of mental health needs, risk and social care supports.

Findings

At six months improvements were seen across all ABC domains in both groups, with greater improvement in the CBS group, compared to usual care in irritability and stereotypy. Between group differences were maintained only for stereotypy at 12 months. No other differences were found.

Originality/value

This paper suggests that PBS delivered by trained and dedicated staff may provide clinical benefits to individuals with challenging behaviours. However, there are issues around integration into existing services that need to be addressed in order to maximise efficiency.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The study was funded by the North Central London Research Consortium (NoCLoR; grant reference 2C10). The funder has had no role or other influence in the study process.

Citation

Inchley-Mort, S., Rantell, K., Wahlich, C. and Hassiotis, A. (2014), "Complex Behaviour Service: enhanced model for challenging behaviour", Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 8 No. 4, pp. 219-227. https://doi.org/10.1108/AMHID-08-2013-0056

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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