The role of specialist inpatient rehabilitation services for people with intellectual disability, autism and mental health, behavioural or forensic needs

Mahesh Odiyoor (Faculty of Intellectual Disability Psychiatry, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Cheshire, UK)
Samuel Joseph Tromans (Faculty of Intellectual Disability Psychiatry, Leicestershire Partnership Trust, Leicester, UK) (Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK)
Regi T. Alexander (Hertfordshire Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, Hatfield, UK) (Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK) (Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK)
Srinaveen Akbari (Department of Forensic Psychiatry, Essex Partnership University NHS Foundation Trust, Wickford, UK)
Gill Bell (Faculty of Intellectual Disability Psychiatry, Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK)
Sandy Bering (Faculty of Mental Health and Disabilities, Greater Manchester Health and Care Commissioning, Manchester, UK)
Sujeet Jaydeokar (Faculty of Intellectual Disability Psychiatry, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Cheshire, UK)
Amrith Shetty (Faculty of Rehabilitation Psychiatry, Cheshire and Wirral Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, Cheshire, UK)

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

ISSN: 2044-1282

Publication date: 21 August 2019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a professional consensus position with regard to the provision of specialist inpatient rehabilitation services for people with intellectual disability (ID), autism and mental health, behavioural or forensic needs in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The concept of rehabilitation is discussed, as well as the functions and goals of specialist inpatient rehabilitation services with regard to the aforementioned contexts. Current use of rehabilitation beds is considered, both on a regional and national scale, as well as various outcome measures, including effectiveness, patient safety and patient experience.

Findings

There is a clear need for specialist inpatient rehabilitation services, though historically there have been instances of inappropriate admissions, as well as lengthy inpatient stays that could have been significantly reduced with the right type of community support package. Such services should be subjected to rigorous measurement of outcome measures, to determine that patients within such services are receiving a consistently high standard of care. Additionally, amendments to current legal frameworks should be considered, with a view to accommodating for individuals with capacity who require continuous community-based supervision.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first article detailing a professional consensus position for specialist inpatient rehabilitation services for people with ID, autism and mental health, behavioural or forensic needs.

Keywords

Citation

Odiyoor, M., Tromans, S.J., Alexander, R.T., Akbari, S., Bell, G., Bering, S., Jaydeokar, S. and Shetty, A. (2019), "The role of specialist inpatient rehabilitation services for people with intellectual disability, autism and mental health, behavioural or forensic needs", Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 13 No. 5, pp. 204-215. https://doi.org/10.1108/AMHID-01-2019-0001

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited

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