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Historical and clinical items of the HCR-20 as predictors of risk within an intellectual disability population

Eddie Chaplin (South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)
Mo Eyeoyibo (Mental Health of Learning Disability, Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust, Kent, UK)
Steve Wright (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK)
Kiriakos Xenitidis (Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK)
Jane McCarthy (East London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK)

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

ISSN: 2044-1282

Article publication date: 2 March 2015

Abstract

Purpose

The use of violence risk assessment measures within intellectual disabilities (ID) services is now the norm and a growing target for research. The purpose of this paper is to examine the clinical utility of the historical and clinical factors of the HCR-20 in predicting violence.

Design/methodology/approach

The study took place within a national low secure service for adults with ID examining all completed admissions over a six-year period, (N=22). Clinical records covering the first three months of admission were examined along with historical reports and incident data recorded at three, six, nine and 12 months admission using the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS).

Findings

Significant positive relationship between Historical score and total number of incidents was established. Patients with challenging behaviour less likely to have a previous history of violence, and more likely to be older at first violent incident than patients without challenging behaviour. Incidents involving patients with autism were less severe and those with no additional psychiatric diagnosis were significantly more likely to have substance misuse problems than those with a diagnosis.

Originality/value

The study found the Historical section was predictive of violent incidents and whilst the study is too small to draw any firm conclusions, the significant positive relationship between the Historical Score and number of incidents for those without additional diagnosis needs to be investigated further as well as the potential positive clinical impact of using the HCR-20 in routine clinical practice.

Keywords

Citation

Chaplin, E., Eyeoyibo, M., Wright, S., Xenitidis, K. and McCarthy, J. (2015), "Historical and clinical items of the HCR-20 as predictors of risk within an intellectual disability population", Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 9 No. 2, pp. 62-69. https://doi.org/10.1108/AMHID-01-2015-0002

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited