A qualitative longitudinal study of the first UK Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA), an integrated peer-support programme for concurrent disorders

Raffaella Margherita Milani (School of Human and Social Sciences, University of West London, London, UK)
Keisha Nahar (School of Human and Social Sciences, University of West London, London, UK)
Daniel Ware (Dual Diagnosis Anonymous Ltd, London, UK)
Alan Butler (Dual Diagnosis Anonymous Ltd, London, UK)
Sean Roush (School of Occupational Therapy, Pacific University, Hillsboro, Oregon, USA)
Doyal Smith (Dual Diagnosis Anonymous of Oregon, Portland, Oregon, USA)
Luisa Perrino (School of Human and Social Sciences, University of West London, London, UK)
John O’Donnell (Dual Diagnosis Anonymous Ltd, London, UK)

Advances in Dual Diagnosis

ISSN: 1757-0972

Publication date: 30 October 2020

Abstract

Purpose

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA) is a peer-led programme developed in the USA, which aims to address mental and addictive disorders in an integrated manner. This study is part of a mixed-methods evaluation of the first DDA pilot in the UK, and the purpose of this study is to explore the impact and mechanism of change of the programme through the perspective of DDA attendees, facilitators and the funding commissioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Six DDA members were interviewed three times over a period of 12 months, the facilitators were interviewed twice and the commissioner was interviewed once. The qualitative longitudinal data were analysed using a trajectory thematic analysis.

Findings

DDA attendance was perceived to have had a positive impact on five main areas: acceptance of self, of others and from others; social functioning; self-development; recovery progression; and feeling of hope. The possibility of addressing both mental health and addiction at the same time was a key factor in the recovery process. The facilitators observed that DDA had contributed to integrate members into employment and education, while the commissioner stressed the importance of joint commissioning and sustainability.

Originality/value

The longitudinal approach provided a unique insight into the recovery process of DDA members. Being able to address the mental health as well as the substance use problems was considered to be a fundamental strength of DDA in comparison to the single purpose peer-support fellowships.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to express their gratitude to the trustees of Sir Halley Stewart Trust for supporting the study. They also thank all DDAmembers, DDA facilitators and the Ealing Drug and Alcohol Commissioner for participating with their valuable contributions.

Citation

Milani, R.M., Nahar, K., Ware, D., Butler, A., Roush, S., Smith, D., Perrino, L. and O’Donnell, J. (2020), "A qualitative longitudinal study of the first UK Dual Diagnosis Anonymous (DDA), an integrated peer-support programme for concurrent disorders", Advances in Dual Diagnosis, Vol. 13 No. 4, pp. 151-167. https://doi.org/10.1108/ADD-01-2020-0001

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020, Emerald Publishing Limited

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