Index

The Value of Design in Retail and Branding

ISBN: 978-1-80071-580-6, eISBN: 978-1-80071-579-0

Publication date: 10 June 2021

This content is currently only available as a PDF

Citation

(2021), "Index", Quartier, K., Petermans, A., Melewar, T.C. and Dennis, C. (Ed.) The Value of Design in Retail and Branding, Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 225-230. https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-80071-579-020211019

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021 by Emerald Publishing Limited


INDEX

Actual self
, 13

Actual social self
, 13

Added value
, 51, 88

of retail design
, 89–90

Aesthetic(s)
, 13–14

judgement
, 27–29

Amazon Dash Cart
, 17–18

Amazon Go
, 11

Ambience
, 86–87

Analysis integration
, 126

Anthropomorphism
, 112, 114

Appreciation in arts
, 27–29

Artefacts
, 69, 86–87

Artistic judgement
, 27–29

Atmospherics
, 87, 209, 211

Austrian school theory
, 73–74

Austrian theory
, 71

Autoethnography
, 147

exploration of concepts
, 147–149

findings
, 153–154

implications for business
, 154

methodology
, 149–150

story
, 151–153

Automated teller machine (ATM)
, 200

Behavioural economics
, 75–78

Behavioural sciences
, 85

Bottletop
, 15–16

Brand Design module
, 202

Brand(ing). See also Localising global brands
, 98–99

assets
, 180–181

extensions
, 97

fit
, 99–100, 103

importance of warmth in brand relationships
, 110–113

narratives
, 54–56

purpose
, 52–53

typicality
, 99–100

warmth
, 113–115

warmth in brand preferences
, 112–113

C-technique
, 31–33

Chain store, consistency of experience within
, 179

Changing principle
, 70–71

Classic economic theory
, 78

Classical School
, 69–70

Classical theory
, 72–73

Clothing manufacturing
, 53

Clustering
, 98–99

Co-creation
, 191, 194, 197–198

environment and setting
, 202

evaluative
, 200

generative
, 200

individual survey questionnaire
, 202–203

limitations
, 205

post design
, 202

practice by FRANK
, 199–202

pre-design phase
, 200

process
, 203–204

research design
, 202–203

Co-design
, 197–198

Collaboration
, 193

Colour decoration principles
, 31

Comic Sans
, 114

Confidence benefits
, 15

Consumer culture theory (CCT)
, 31

Consumer experience
, 89, 123, 193

Consumer value
, 68–69, 159

Consumers’ perception
, 88–89, 115

Control
, 14

Convenience
, 11

Corporate social responsibility (CSR)
, 54–56

Correction
, 71

Cortina
, 113–114

COVID-19 crisis
, 19–20, 223

Crossmodal correspondence index (CMCI)
, 44–45

Crossmodal correspondences
, 39–40

aim and scope of studies
, 41–42

methodology
, 42–46

results
, 46–48

studying concept of designing by
, 41–48

Cultural appropriation
, 190

Cultural exchange
, 189, 191, 194

Cultural interpretation
, 190

Culture
, 129

Customer experience
, 26–27, 39–40, 209

Customer in-store experience
, 137–138

Customer value
, 9, 68

conceptualisation
, 10–20

context
, 19–20

interaction between customer and store
, 10–11

multidimensional
, 11–19

personal
, 19

in physical retail
, 9

relevance
, 9–10

trade-off
, 11

Customer-to-customer interactions (CtoC interactions)
, 15

Cyberball
, 112–113

Cybercrimes
, 17

Dark stores
, 222

Design. See also Retail design
, 221

characteristics of design assignment
, 42–44

future of design in retail
, 221–223

key findings
, 164–165

methodology
, 44

research agenda and methodology
, 163–164

results
, 46–48

up-to-date summary on experience and value
, 161–162

Design outcome

methodology
, 44–46

results
, 47–48

Digital retailing
, 221–222

Digital technologies
, 54, 56, 111

Digitisation
, 185

E-personal touch
, 31

E-shopping
, 90

EcoAlf
, 51, 56–57, 59–60

Ecological benefits
, 15–16

Ecological costs
, 18

Ecological validity
, 213–214

Economic theories
, 67, 69–70, 75–77

Economic value
, 68–69

equation
, 67

Effort
, 16–17

Emotional well-being
, 88–89

Endogenous Growth Theory. See New Growth theory

Enjoyment
, 13

Environmental context
, 19–20

Environmental simulation techniques
, 209–210

advantages and disadvantages of representation media
, 215

evolution over time
, 212–214

method
, 210–211

research objectives
, 210

results
, 211–215

Escapism
, 14

Everyday low prices (EDLP)
, 16

Excellence
, 12

Expectations
, 130

Experience

economy
, 71, 159

of intended brand assets
, 179–180

predominance of
, 130

in relation to retail design
, 26–27

in retail design process
, 163

of sensorial and meaning properties
, 177–179

up-to-date summary on
, 161–162

web
, 26–27

Experiential retailing
, 161–162

Experiential stores
, 159–160

External influences (EI)
, 126

Eye-tracking
, 138, 140, 142

Familiarity
, 128–129

Fashion brands
, 53, 57

Fashion industry
, 53

Fast moving consumer goods (FMCG)
, 95, 97

Filtering approaches
, 127–128

Financial risk
, 18

‘Fishing for Litter’ project
, 58

Flagship stores
, 193

FRANK
, 198–199, 201

brand preference
, 204

co-creation practice by
, 199–202

flagship store
, 202–203

Fuzzy front end of design process
, 200

Gaze behaviour
, 140

Global brands
, 187–190

Globalisation
, 185

Grocery store designs

brand assets and sensorial and meaning properties
, 180–181

choice of retail designs
, 174

consistency of experience within chain store
, 179

experience of intended brand assets
, 179–180

experience of sensorial and meaning properties
, 177–179

measurement of experienced properties
, 175, 177

Harrods
, 88

Haverkamp theory
, 40–41

Hedonic value
, 68

Holism
, 39–40

Human capital
, 75

Ideal self
, 13

Ideal social self
, 13

In-store eye-tracking
, 138–139

Independent retailers
, 29

analysis
, 30

empirical findings
, 30–33

implications
, 33–34

media elicited interviews
, 30

methodological considerations
, 29–30

recruiting participants
, 29–30

theoretical considerations
, 26–29

Individual context
, 19

Individual crossmodal congruency score (ICMCS)
, 45–48

Information and communications technology (ICT)
, 54–56

Innovation
, 98–99

Institutional theory
, 71, 74

Integrated analysis
, 124–125

Intended brand assets, experience of
, 179–180

Interaction stimuli, culturally bound narrative of
, 127

International Colloquium of Design, Branding and Marketing (ICDBM)
, 3

Interpersonal benefits
, 15

Introspective research methods
, 149

JBC (Belgian fashion retailer)
, 13

Knowledge gaps
, 69

Labour theory of value
, 69–70

Laundromat services
, 72–73

Liberty
, 88

Local markets
, 187–190

Local shops, revaluation of
, 222–223

Localisation
, 185

Localised retail design
, 189–191, 194

Localising global brands
, 185–186

global brands and local markets
, 187–190

taste-making in retail design
, 186–187

Market context
, 19

Market value
, 68–69

Marketing
, 85

Maya principle
, 99–100

Memory
, 128–129

Mixed methods research design
, 86

Mobile eye-tracking
, 139

Multi-channel marketing
, 25

Multi-layered analysis process
, 125–126

Multi-layered omnichannel consumer experience
, 131

Multi-layered patchwork
, 126

Multisensory design
, 40

importance
, 41

Neo-classical School
, 69–70

Neo-classical theory
, 71–73

New Growth theory
, 71, 75

Nonprofits
, 111

Novelty
, 15

NTU-ADM
, 198–202

Omnichannel customer experience
, 123–125

analysis outcomes
, 131–133

culturally bound narrative of interaction stimuli
, 127

methodology
, 124–125

multi-layered analysis process
, 125–126

shared understanding
, 124

Omnichannel retailers
, 123–124

Online retail environment
, 39

Online shopping choices
, 154

Parameter theory
, 27

Performance risk
, 17–18

Personalisation
, 14, 128–129

personalisation-privacy paradox
, 17

Physical environment design (PED)
, 85–86, 88

application
, 86

Physical retail. See also Retail
, 9, 11

environment
, 39

stores
, 87

Physical risk
, 18

Plain Jane
, 141

Praxeology
, 73

Preferences
, 130

Price
, 16

Primark
, 191–193

Privacy risk
, 17

Product designers
, 40–41

Product excellence
, 12

Profit
, 70

Promotional pricing
, 16

Psychological analysis approaches
, 125, 131, 133

Psychology
, 85

of aesthetics
, 27

Purpose-led brand storytelling
, 54–56

Purpose-led brand/purpose-led marketing
, 52

Recognisability
, 95

Relational benefits
, 15

Representation media, advantages and disadvantages of
, 215

Retail

designers
, 34, 173–174

environments
, 137, 173

market
, 159

spaces
, 89

stores
, 86–88

Retail design
, 3, 72–73, 78, 85, 137–138

added value
, 89–90

for global brands
, 185

model
, 161

participants
, 139

procedure
, 139–140

process
, 160–161

proposal for
, 165–168

results
, 140–142

vs. researching
, 1–2

store setting
, 139

study set-up
, 139

taste-making in
, 186–187

translating academic knowledge
, 2–3

value and experience in
, 163

Retailer(s)
, 15, 34, 67, 89–90, 154

Belgian
, 16

designers
, 68–69

local
, 222–223

Rituals
, 96–97

Scan-and-go technology
, 14

Security risk
, 17

Self-congruity
, 12–13

Self-esteem
, 12–13

Self-image congruence
, 12–13

Self-narrative
, 150

Selfridges
, 88

Semantic transformation method
, 98–99

Service excellence
, 12

Shared value
, 52

Shop
, 25

Shopping destinations
, 85

Snuggle
, 112–113

bear
, 109

brand of laundry detergent
, 109

Social benefits
, 15

Social context
, 19

Social exclusion
, 111–112

consumption in coping with
, 112

Social groups
, 129

Social influence, habit formation, individual self, feelings and cognition, and tangibility model (SHIFT model)
, 54–55, 60

Social isolation
, 111–112

Social life cycle assessment
, 53

Societal benefits
, 16

Societal costs
, 18–19

Sociological analysis
, 126

Southwest Airlines
, 109, 111

Space
, 131

Spatiality
, 86–87

Special treatment benefits
, 15

Standardised retail design
, 188–189

Starbucks
, 14

Status
, 13

Stereoscope Coffee shop
, 15

Stimulus-organism-response approach (SOR approach)
, 33, 125

Store(s). See also Grocery store designs
, 222, 173

designs
, 185

retail
, 86–88

Stories
, 51

Storytelling
, 51

approach
, 150

brand purpose
, 52–53

case study
, 56–60

purpose-led brand
, 54–56

sustainability
, 53–54

theory and practice
, 52

Structural equation modelling (SEM)
, 86

Subjective personal introspection (SPI)
, 149

Supply chain
, 53

Sustainability
, 53–54

Sustainable development
, 53

Synesthetic correspondences. See Crossmodal correspondences

Taste-makers
, 186

Taste-making in retail design
, 186–187

Tentree
, 109

Tide
, 112–113

Time
, 16, 131

Traditionally sensory processing
, 40

Triangular DesignerSpace

brand extensions
, 97

interplay between branding and innovation
, 98–99

Maya principle
, 99–100

method
, 100–102

results
, 102–104

Triple bottom line
, 54

Undergraduate Research Experience on Campus (URECA)
, 203

Unilever
, 109

‘Upcycling the Oceans’ project
, 57

Urbanisation
, 185

Utilitarian value
, 68

Value
, 67–68

behavioural economics
, 75–78

co-creation
, 198

consumer
, 68–69

creation
, 70–75

design
, 78–79

economic
, 68–69

economic principles
, 70–75

economic theories and
, 69–70

in exchange theory
, 69–70

market
, 68–69

perceptions
, 10

proposition
, 9–10

of retail design
, 73, 163

systems
, 71

theories
, 69–70

up-to-date summary on
, 161–162

in use
, 69–70, 198

Virgin Mobile flagship store
, 193

Visual analogue scale (VAS)
, 44, 175

Warmth
, 109

in brand design
, 110

in brand preferences
, 112–113

brand warmth
, 113–115

consumption in coping with social exclusion
, 112

importance of warmth in brand relationships
, 110–113

increasing social isolation and impacts on consumers
, 111–112

Work method
, 42

Prelims
Introduction
Part 1 The Value of…Design
Chapter 1 Conceptualising Customer Value in Physical Retail: A Marketing Perspective
Chapter 2 Appreciating and Judging the Design of Independent Retailers' Blended Concepts
Chapter 3 The Added Value of Designing by Crossmodal Correspondences
Chapter 4 Fashion and Lifestyle Brands: Storytelling within Purpose-Led Brands in Order to Contribute to Growth
Part 2 The Value of…Experience
Chapter 5 The Influence of Economic Theories on the Value of Retail Design: A Designer’s Perspective
Chapter 6 The Added Value of Retail Design for the New Age of Consumerism
Chapter 7 The Triangular Designers’ Space: Methodical Approach to Balance Brand Typicality and Novelty
Chapter 8 The Importance of Warmth in Brand Design
Part 3 The Value of…Context
Chapter 9 Virtually the Same: Understanding Consumer Experience in an Omnichannel Environment
Chapter 10 Retail Design as a Communication Strategy: Exploring Customer Experience via Eye-tracking
Chapter 11 Exploring In-store Shopping Experiences and Resultant Purchasing Influence: An Autoethnographic Approach
Chapter 12 Designing Valuable Experiential Retail Environments: A Review of the Design Process
Part 4 The Value of…Interdisciplinarity
Chapter 13 The Interlink between Sensorial and Meaning Properties of a Retail Design and Brand Assets: A Comparison of Three Grocery Store Designs
Chapter 14 Local Collaboration in Retail Design: A Strategy for Localising Global Brands
Chapter 15 Evidencing Value Creation in ‘Value Co-creation’: A Case Study of Singapore's Second Largest Banking Group
Chapter 16 Environmental Simulation Techniques in Retailing: A Review from a Store Atmospheric and Customer Experience Perspective
Conclusion
Index