Prelims

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change

ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4, eISBN: 978-1-78769-955-7

Publication date: 2 July 2020

Citation

(2020), "Prelims", Walklate, S., Fitz-Gibbon, K., Maher, J. and McCulloch, J. (Ed.) The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change (Emerald Studies in Criminology, Feminism and Social Change), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. i-xvii. https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-78769-955-720201001

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited


Half Title

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change

Series-page

Emerald Studies in Criminology, Feminism and Social Change

Series Editors:

Sandra Walklate, Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology, University of Liverpool conjoint Chair of Criminology, Monash University.

Kate Fitz-Gibbon, School of Social Sciences at Monash University and Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre, Australia.

Jude McCulloch, Monash University and Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre, Australia.

JaneMaree Maher, Centre for Women’s Studies and Gender Research Sociology, Monash University, Australia.

Emerald Studies in Criminology, Feminism and Social Change offers a platform for innovative, engaged, and forward-looking feminist-informed work to explore the interconnections between social change and the capacity of criminology to grapple with the implications of such change.

Social change, whether as a result of the movement of peoples, the impact of new technologies, the potential consequences of climate change, or more commonly identified features of changing societies, such as ageing populations, intergenerational conflict, the changing nature of work, increasing awareness of the problem of gendered violence(s), and/or changing economic and political context, takes its toll across the globe in infinitely more nuanced and interconnected ways than previously imagined. Each of these connections carry implications for what is understood as crime, the criminal, the victim of crime, and the capacity of criminology as a discipline to make sense of these evolving interconnections. Feminist analysis, despite its contentious relationship with the discipline of criminology, has much to offer in strengthening the discipline to better understand the complexity of the world in the twenty-first century and to scan the horizon for emerging, possible or likely futures.

This series invites feminist-informed scholars particularly those working comparatively across disciplinary boundaries to take up the challenges posed by social change for the discipline of criminology. The series offers authors a space to adopt and develop strong, critical personal views whether in the format of research monographs, single or co-authored books, or edited collections. We are keen to promote global views and debates on these issues and welcome proposals embracing such perspectives.

Forthcoming Titles in this Series:

Mothering from the Inside, Kelly Lockwood

Online Anti-rape Activism, Rachel Loney-Howes

Gender and the Violence(s) of War and Armed Conflict: More Dangerous to be a Woman?, Stacy Banwell

Young Women’s Carceral Geographies: Journeys In, Out, and Beyond Confinement, Anna Schliehe

Carceral Feminicidio: The Disappearance of Indigenous Women into Prisons, Gillian Balfour

Praise for The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change

‘Nearly half a century after International Women's Year, powerful mechanisms of gender inequality persist around the world. They generate poverty and cultural oppression, and are deeply implicated in violence, crime and victimization. This Handbook documents recent feminist criminology from many countries, highlighting gender dynamics around the Global South, new forms of online abuse, state violence, emerging theories of gender and crime, and creative strategies for social change. A great resource for criminology, and for the wider struggle for gender justice.’

Raewyn Connell, Author of Southern Theory and Gender: In World Perspective

‘This fascinating collection tells the story of how criminology and victimology were transformed by feminist perspectives, and reveals the compelling new insights critical perspectives on gender are bringing to the study of social harms, including those inflected by the legacies of colonialism, globalization and state-sanctioned forms of social control. Anyone in doubt as to the difference feminism and criminology can make to a world complexly fractured by violence, abuse and accumulating inequalities should read this book. Insightful, inspiring and empowering.’

David Gadd, Professor of Criminology, University of Manchester, UK

‘Does criminology “see” gender? This is the central question engaged in this wide-ranging, important and timely volume. This book engages this topic in ways that are theoretically and empirically expansive. The collection offers depth and breadth of engagement with the ways in which criminology has ignored, marginalized and sometimes engaged questions of gender and all its related intersections. It also explores theoretical, methodological and practical possibilities that are important for shaping the discipline into the future.

The book includes contributions that cover a broad range of topics that go beyond questions of gender in criminological research to include serious engagement with intersectionality, engagement with the hegemony of global northern theorizing and voice, as well as work that touches on questions of decolonization in the criminological agenda.

The book is fundamental reading in criminology, women's and gender studies, and other disciplines interested in feminist work on violence, gendered violence in particular. This resource is essential for teachers in these fields and its interdisciplinary nature enables us to not only deconstruct disciplinary boundaries but also facilitates the asking of important questions about violence, victimhood and perpetration. I will recommend this book to all of my students and colleagues engaged in critical psychological work on violence and gender.’

Floretta Boonzaier, Professor of Psychology and Co-Director of the Hub for Decolonial Feminist Psychologies in Africa at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

Title Page

The Emerald Handbook of Feminism, Criminology and Social Change

Edited by

Sandra Walklate, Kate Fitz-Gibbon, JaneMaree Maher and Jude McCulloch

United Kingdom – North America – Japan – India – Malaysia – China

Copyright Page

Emerald Publishing Limited

Howard House, Wagon Lane, Bingley BD16 1WA, UK

First edition 2020

Editorial matter and selection © 2020 Sandra Walklate, Kate Fitz-Gibbon, JaneMaree Maher and Jude McCulloch. Published under exclusive licence. Individual chapters © 2020 Emerald Publishing Limited

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British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library

ISBN: 978-1-78769-956-4 (Print)

ISBN: 978-1-78769-955-7 (Online)

ISBN: 978-1-78769-957-1 (Epub)

Contents

About the Contributors xi
Acknowledgements xvii
Part One: The Origins of Feminist Criminology
Introduction to Part One 3
Chapter 1 Evolving Feminist Perspectives in Criminology and Victimology and Their Influence on Understandings of, and Responses to, Intimate Partner Violence
Kate Fitz-Gibbon, Sandra Walklate, Jude McCulloch and JaneMaree Maher 7
Chapter 2 Feminist Perspectives in Criminology: Early Feminist Perspectives
Loraine Gelsthorpe 17
Chapter 3 Feminist Approaches to Victimology
Jody Clay-Warner and Timothy G. Edgemon 35
Chapter 4 Feminist Activism and Scholarship in Resisting and Responding to Gender-based Abuse
Joanne Belknap and Deanne Grant 51
Chapter 5 Feminist Criminology in a Time of ‘Digital Feminism’: Can the #MeToo Movement Create Fundamental Cultural Change?
Annie Cossins 69
Part Two: Research Beyond the Global North
Introduction to Part Two 97
Chapter 6 Gender Violence Law Reform and Feminist Criminology in Brazil
Thiago Pierobom de Ávila 101
Chapter 7 The Contribution of Critical Ecofeminism to the Criminological Debate in Spain: Debating All Rules of All Tribes
Gema Varona 119
Chapter 8 Public Attitude Towards Rape Crime and the Treatment of Its Victims in Delhi City
Vibha Hetu 137
Chapter 9 On Honour, Culture and Violence Against Women in Black and Minority Ethnic Communities
Aisha K. Gill and Samantha Walker 157
Part Three: Extending the Criminological Agenda
Introduction to Part Three 179
Chapter 10 Masculinities and Interpersonal Violence
Stephen Tomsen and James W. Messerschmidt 185
Chapter 11 Disrupting the Boundaries of the Academe: Co-creating Knowledge and Sex Work ‘Academic-activism’
Laura Connelly and Teela Sanders 203
Chapter 12 Social Change and the Banality of Patriarchal Oppression and Gender Inequality
Dawn L. Rothe and Victoria E. Collins 219
Chapter 13 Reflections on Women’s Resistance and Social Change in Africa
Temitope B. Oriola 235
Chapter 14 Speaking Life, Speaking Death: Jerusalemite Children Confronting Israel’s Technologies of Violence
Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian 253
Chapter 15 Caught between a Rock and a Hard Place – Human Rights, Life Imprisonment and Gender Stereotyping: A Critical Analysis of Khamtokhu and Aksenchik v. Russia (2017)
Marion Vannier 271
Part Four: Looking to the Future
Introduction to Part Four 291
Chapter 16 Bringing Racialised Women and Girls into View: An Intersectional Approach to Punishment and Incarceration
Julie Stubbs 295
Chapter 17 Technology and Violence Against Women
Bridget A. Harris 317
Chapter 18 Enhancing Feminist Understandings of Violence Against Women: Looking to the Future
Walter S. DeKeseredy 337
Chapter 19 Criminological Lessons on/from Sexual Violence
May-Len Skilbrei 357
Chapter 20 Gender-based Violence: Case Studies from the Global South
Melissa Bull, Kerry Carrington and Laura Vitis 373
Chapter 21 Postscript. Feminism, Activism and Social Change: A Call to Action for Feminist Criminology
Nancy A. Wonders 395
Index 401

About the Contributors

Joanne Belknap is a Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado-Boulder, a Past-president of the American Society of Criminology, and has won numerous research, teaching, and service awards. The fifth edition of her book, The Invisible Woman: Gender, Crime, and Justice, is in progress.

Melissa Bull is a Professor in the School of Justice, and the Director of the QUT Centre for Justice, at the Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Her expertise lies in the field of crime control and governance, with a focus on comparative criminology and policing in differently organised states.

Kerry Carrington is the Head of the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. She is a leading scholar in the field of feminist criminology, author of Southern Criminology (Routledge, 2019) and Feminism and Global Justice (Routledge, 2015), and has an ARC grant to study women’s police stations in Argentina.

Jody Clay-Warner is Meigs Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Associate Director of the Owens Institute for Behavioral Research, University of Georgia. Her research focusses on criminal victimisation with a focus on violence against women and revictimisation. Her recent projects examine campus sexual assault and human trafficking.

Victoria E. Collins is an Associate Professor in the School of Justice Studies at Eastern Kentucky University, USA. Victoria has published three books including State Crime, Women and Gender (Routledge, 2016); The Violence of Neoliberalism: Crime, Harm and Inequality (Routledge, 2019); and Explorations in Critical Criminology: Essays in Honor of William J. Chambliss (Brill, 2019) in addition to articles in journals such as Social Justice, Crime and Justice, Crime, Media, Culture, Critical Criminology, Critical Sociology, and Contemporary Justice Review.

Laura Connelly is a Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Salford. Her research interests include the sex industry, migration, ‘modern slavery’, and ‘post-racial’ theory. There is a social justice element to Laura’s work, which centres on the rights of (migrant) sex workers and challenging police injustices.

Annie Cossins is a Professor of Law and Criminology in the Faculty of Law, University of New Wales, Sydney, Australia. Her previous theoretical monographs in the area of feminist criminology include Masculinities, Sexualities and Child Sexual Abuse (2000) and Female Criminality: Infanticide, Moral Panics and the Female Body (2013).

Walter S. DeKeseredy is Anna Deane Carlson Endowed Chair of Social Sciences, Director of the Research Center on Violence, and Professor of Sociology at West Virginia University. He has published 25 books, 100 scientific journal articles, and 80 scholarly book chapters on violence against women and other social problems.

Timothy G. Edgemon is a Doctoral student at the University of Georgia. The overarching goal of his research is to understand how the criminal justice system operates as an engine of inequality. His work primarily focusses on how contact with the criminal justice system impacts mental health outcomes and how these health outcomes differ along gendered lines.

Kate Fitz-Gibbon is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University (Australia) and Deputy Director of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre. Her research examines family violence, the law of homicide, and the impact of criminal law reform across Australian and international jurisdictions.

Loraine Gelsthorpe is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice and Director of the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, UK. Her publications include Feminist Perspectives in Criminology (1990, edited with Allison Morris, Open University Press) and regular contributions to the Oxford Handbook of Criminology (Oxford University Press) on ‘Feminism and Criminology’. Her key research revolves around women and criminal justice.

Aisha K. Gill, Ph.D., FRSA, CBE, is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Roehampton, UK. Her main areas of interest and research are health and criminal justice responses to violence against black, minority ethnic, and refugee women in the UK, Iraqi Kurdistan, India, and Pakistan. She has been involved in addressing the problem of violence against women and girls, ‘honour’ crimes, and forced marriage at the grassroots level for the past 21 years. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, editorial member of the British Journal of Criminology and Feminist Review Collective.

Deanne Grant holds Master’s degrees in Indigenous Governance and International Studies and has a Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of Colorado-Boulder and is an Assistant Professor at Fort Lewis College in the Sociology and the Native American and Indigenous Studies Departments. Her specific research interests include Indigenous feminisms, Native American and Indigenous studies, and Native American women.

Bridget A. Harris is an Australian Research Council `Discovery Early Career Researcher Award’ Fellow and Senior Lecturer in the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, and member of the Centre for Justice and Digital Media Research Centre at Queensland University of Technology. Her forthcoming collection on technology and domestic violence - edited with Delanie Woodlock - will be published by Routledge.

Vibha Hetu is a Consultant at L.N.J.N. National Institute of Criminology and Forensic Science, Ministry of Home Affairs, Delhi, India. Earlier, she was an Assistant Professor at O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana. Her first book Victims of Rape: Rights, Expectations and Restoration is published by Thomson Reuters in 2017.

JaneMaree Maher is Professor and Director of the Centre for Women’s Studies and Gender Research Sociology at Monash University. She works on gendered violence and hate crimes using feminist legal paradigms. Her research also addresses family and gender issues with a focus on women’s caring and employment in family life.

James W. Messerschmidt is Distinguished University Professor of Sociology and Chair of the Criminology Department at the University of Southern Maine, USA. In addition to over 75 articles and book chapters, he has authored 14 books, most recently Masculinities and Crime: A Quarter Century of Theory and Research. 25-Year Anniversary Edition. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018).

Jude McCulloch is a Professor of Criminology at Monash University and the Director of the Monash Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre. Her research looks at the boundaries between public and private violence and the implications of this for women and the concept of national security.

Temitope B. Oriola is a joint Editor-in-Chief of African Security and an Associate Professor at the University of Alberta, Canada. A recipient of the prestigious Governor General of Canada Academic Gold Medal, Oriola’s book Criminal Resistance? The Politics of Kidnapping Oil Workers (Routledge, 2016 [orig. 2013]) is one of a small number of book-length sociological investigations of political kidnapping in the English language. Oriola’s ongoing research focusses on the ascendance of extremist non-state transnational actors, particularly in the Lake Chad Basin. This research investigates the intricacies of the ascendance of Boko Haram, the trends and patterns of Boko Haram’s operations, the gender dimensions (particularly sexual and gender-based violence), and the backdrop of global jihadi terrorist trajectories. Dr Oriola has published in leading scholarly venues such as Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, Third World Quarterly, Sociology, the British Journal of Criminology, Canadian Journal of Criminology & Criminal Justice, Criminal Justice Ethics and Critical Studies on Terrorism, among others. He is a Vice President (president-elect) of the Canadian Association of African Studies.

Thiago Pierobom de Ávila is an Associate Professor in the Ph.D. Programme of UniCEUB, Brasilia, Brazil. He is an Associate Researcher in the Institute for Criminal Law and Sciences, University of Lisbon, Portugal and a Fellow of Monash University Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre, Australia. He is also a Senior Prosecutor at the Office of the Attorney General, Brasilia, Brazil.

Dawn L. Rothe is a Professor at the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Florida Atlantic University, USA. She is the author of 10 books including Crimes of the Powerful: An Introductory Text (Routledge, 2016); The Violence of Neoliberalism: Crime, Harm and Inequality (Routledge, 2019); and Explorations in Critical Criminology: Essays in Honor of William J. Chambliss (Brill, 2019) in addition to nearly 100 articles and book chapters.

Teela Sanders is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Leicester. Her research focusses on the intersections between gender, regulation, governance, and crime, specifically in relation to the sex industry. She is working on a two-year Leverhulme Research Fellowship titled ‘Revisiting the Brothels’.

Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian is the Lawrence D. Biele Chair in Law at the Faculty of Law-Institute of Criminology and the School of Social Work and Public Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is a Palestinian feminist activist and the Director of the Gender Studies Programme at Mada al-Carmel, the Arab Center for Applied Social Research in Haifa, and was recently appointed as the Global Chair in Law – Queen Mary University of London.

May-Len Skilbrei is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Oslo, Norway. She has published on prostitution, human trafficking, and sexual violence, most recently in British Journal of Criminology, Annual Review of Criminology, and Anti-Trafficking Review. She recently co-edited the book Rape in the Nordic Countries (Routledge, 2020).

Julie Stubbs is a Professor in the Faculty of Law, UNSW, Sydney, Australia. She has published widely on domestic violence, homicide, battered woman syndrome, sexual assault, restorative justice, bail, women’s imprisonment, and justice reinvestment. Her books include Justice Reinvestment: Winding Back Imprisonment (with Brown et al., Palgrave, 2016) and Australian Violence: Crime, Criminology and Beyond (edited with S. Tomsen, The Federation Press, 2016).

Stephen Tomsen is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Western Sydney, Australia. He has decades of experience with researching topics in socio-legal inequality, violence, masculinity, sexuality, drinking, drug use, urban order, and criminal justice. His current research includes a team study of gendered violence and harm at public music festivals, and another on uneven official responses to the vulnerabilities due to urban drinking and drug use.

Marion Vannier is a Lecturer in Criminology at the University of Manchester. She publishes on long-term imprisonment and immigration detention. Her forthcoming book is Normalizing Extreme Imprisonment: the case of life without parole in California (1900-2016) (Oxford University Press, 2020)

Gema Varona is a Senior Researcher at the Institute of Criminology, University of the Basque Country and teaches Victimology and Criminal Policy. She was the former Coordinator of the degree in Criminology and a Co-director of the Master in Victimology in the University of the Basque Country. She is the Co-editor of the Journal of Victimology/Revista de Victimología.

Laura Vitis is a Lecturer in the School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia. Her research focusses on how technology is used to facilitate gendered, sexual, and intimate partner violence. In addition, her work examines the regulation of and resistance to technologically facilitated violence, youth sexting, and the sex offender register.

Samantha Walker is a Criminologist based in Plymouth, UK. In 2018, she received her Ph.D. from Keele University for her research on ‘honour’-based violence and victimisation in rural communities. Her current research interests explore the intersections between honour, shame, and violence in a multitude of social, cultural, and gendered contexts; neoliberalism, austerity, and social harm within the criminal justice system; and pornography, sexual deviancy, and harm.

Sandra Walklate is Eleanor Rathbone Chair of Sociology and Conjoint Chair of Criminology in the School of Social Sciences at Monash University. Her research continues to be focussed on criminal victimisation and its impact particularly in relation to violence against women.

Nancy A. Wonders is a Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University. She has served as the Chair of the American Society of Criminology’s Division on Women and Crime and has published extensively on global injustices, the criminology of borders and mobility, and the relationship between inequality, difference, and justice.

Acknowledgements

This book is part of a wider project and team work emanating from the Gender and Family Violence Prevention Centre at Monash University, Australia. The editors owe a debt of gratitude to the rest of the team working with us at the Centre. In particular, we are grateful for the support of Dr Jasmine McGowan, Associate Prof. Silke Meyer, Dr Naomi Pfitzner, Dr Tess Bartlett, and Kate Thomas (now working for Australia’s National Research Organisation for Women’s Safety) for keeping the work of the Centre going whilst we were focussed on this and other projects.

Throughout our work, together we have benefitted from the insights and expertise of many feminist scholars. We would like to thank those who attended the Intimate Partner Violence, Risk and Security Workshop at Monash Prato in September 2017, that resulted in the edited collection, Fitz-Gibbon, K., Walklate, S., McCulloch, J. and Maher, J. (Eds). 2018. Intimate Partner Violence, Risk and Security: Securing Women’s Lives in a Global World, London, Routledge. Some of those who attended this workshop have also contributed to this handbook and we are very appreciative of their ongoing willingness to work with us. Other contributors took a risk to work with us for the first time. We hope you have enjoyed the experience as much as we have enjoyed working with you all and everything we have all learned together in this journey. It is the case that this collection has brought together some hugely important and insightful work and we are very grateful to our contributors for ensuring that this will be a flagship collection.

At the same time, of course, our life as editors goes on in other realms too. We would like to acknowledge the wider support of colleagues at Monash University for the collegiality offered to us all along with that provided by our respective partners and families who continue to support us with good humour and patience.

The Editors

December 2019.

Prelims
Part One: The Origins of Feminist Criminology
Introduction to Part One
Chapter 1: Evolving Feminist Perspectives in Criminology and Victimology and Their Influence on Understandings of, and Responses to, Intimate Partner Violence
Chapter 2: Feminist Perspectives in Criminology: Early Feminist Perspectives
Chapter 3: Feminist Approaches to Victimology
Chapter 4: Feminist Activism and Scholarship in Resisting and Responding to Gender-based Abuse
Chapter 5: Feminist Criminology in a Time of ‘Digital Feminism’: Can the #MeToo Movement Create Fundamental Cultural Change?
Part Two: Research Beyond the Global North
Introduction to Part Two
Chapter 6: Gender Violence Law Reform and Feminist Criminology in Brazil
Chapter 7: The Contribution of Critical Ecofeminism to the Criminological Debate in Spain: Debating All Rules of All Tribes
Chapter 8: Public Attitude Towards Rape Crime and the Treatment of Its Victims in Delhi City
Chapter 9: On Honour, Culture and Violence Against Women in Black and Minority Ethnic Communities
Part Three: Extending the Criminological Agenda
Introduction to Part Three
Chapter 10: Masculinities and Interpersonal Violence
Chapter 11: Disrupting the Boundaries of the Academe: Co-creating Knowledge and Sex Work ‘Academic-activism’
Chapter 12: Social Change and the Banality of Patriarchal Oppression and Gender Inequality
Chapter 13: Reflections on Women’s Resistance and Social Change in Africa
Chapter 14: Speaking Life, Speaking Death: Jerusalemite Children Confronting Israel’s Technologies of Violence
Chapter 15: Caught between a Rock and a Hard Place – Human Rights, Life Imprisonment and Gender Stereotyping: A Critical Analysis of Khamtokhu and Aksenchik v. Russia (2017)
Part Four: Looking to the Future
Introduction to Part Four
Chapter 16: Bringing Racialised Women and Girls into View: An Intersectional Approach to Punishment and Incarceration
Chapter 17: Technology and Violence Against Women
Chapter 18: Enhancing Feminist Understandings of Violence Against Women: Looking to the Future
Chapter 19: Criminological Lessons on/from Sexual Violence
Chapter 20: Gender-based Violence: Case Studies from the Global South
Chapter 21: Postscript. Feminism, Activism and Social Change: A Call to Action for Feminist Criminology
Index