To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Recognition of intellectual disabilities and autism in psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

Elspeth Bradley (Psychiatrist‐in‐Chief at Surrey Place Centre, Toronto, Canada and an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada)
Yona Lunsky (Psychologist in the Dual Diagnosis Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada and are Associate Professors in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada)
Anna Palucka ( Psychologist in the Dual Diagnosis Program at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada and are Associate Professors in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada)
Soula Homitidis (Psychologist on the York Catholic District School Board, Toronto, Canada)

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

ISSN: 2044-1282

Article publication date: 17 November 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine: the extent to which an intellectual disability diagnosis meets current diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM) diagnostic criteria; the prevalence of reported autism spectrum disorders (ASD); and the extent to which assessment of developmental issues is central to the diagnosis of psychotic disorder, in patients discharged with a diagnosis of psychotic disorder and intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Of all patients discharged with psychotic disorder during a four‐year period (n=3339), chart reviews were completed on those also diagnosed with intellectual disability or borderline IQ.

Findings

The findings if this paper are threefold: only 39 percent of the 41 individuals discharged with a diagnosis of psychotic disorder and intellectual disability met documented DSM criteria for intellectual disability; the prevalence of reported ASD was much lower than expected; and the average number of different discharge diagnoses per individual over time was 4.8. Schizophrenia diagnoses were made early in the diagnostic process and tended to persist even when ASD concerns were documented.

Originality/value

The results support the need to systematically assess the developmental issues of patients with intellectual disability as part of the psychiatric diagnostic formulation. Differential diagnoses of psychotic‐like behaviours seen in people with intellectual disability, and alternative frameworks for understanding these behaviours, which in turn should guide more effective interventions and treatment, are discussed.

Keywords

Citation

Bradley, E., Lunsky, Y., Palucka, A. and Homitidis, S. (2011), "Recognition of intellectual disabilities and autism in psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders", Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 5 No. 6, pp. 4-18. https://doi.org/10.1108/20441281111187153

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited