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Social exclusion and mental health – how people with mental health problems are disadvantaged: an overview

Jed Boardman (Senior Policy Advisor at the Centre for Mental Health, London, UK)

Mental Health and Social Inclusion

ISSN: 2042-8308

Article publication date: 15 August 2011

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of social exclusion and the way in which people with mental health problems are excluded from mainstream society in contemporary Britain.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the main findings of the work of the Royal College of Psychiatrists Scoping Group on Social Exclusion and Mental Health.

Findings

An individual is socially excluded if he or she does not participate in key activities of the society in which he or she lives. People with mental health problems, particularly those with long‐term psychoses, are among the most excluded groups in the UK. They may be excluded from material resources (poverty), from socially valued productive activity, from social relations and neighborhoods, from civic participation and from health and health services.

Originality/value

The findings of the Scoping Group provide an up to date view of the exclusion in people with mental health problems in the UK.

Keywords

Citation

Boardman, J. (2011), "Social exclusion and mental health – how people with mental health problems are disadvantaged: an overview", Mental Health and Social Inclusion, Vol. 15 No. 3, pp. 112-121. https://doi.org/10.1108/20428301111165690

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited