Does IPR promote innovation? New evidence from developed and developing countries

Hua Wang (School of Economics and Trade, Hunan University, Changsha, China)
Mingyong Lai (School of Economics and Trade, Hunan University, Changsha, China)
Maxim Spivakovsky (School of Economics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA)

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship

ISSN: 1756-1396

Publication date: 1 June 2012

Abstract

Purpose

Following the controversy regarding the effects of stronger intellectual property rights (IPR) on technological innovation, the purpose of this paper is to systemically examine the relationship between IPR and technological innovation under the North‐South analytical framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Using panel data from 27 developed countries and 57 developing countries, this paper operates the empirical examination on determinants of technology innovation in an open economy by separated sample of the North and the South. The paper adopts the instrumental variable (IV) estimation to handle the possible endogenous problem caused by IPR variable.

Findings

This paper finds that the threshold effects of stronger IPR on innovation depended on the initial IPR level. Neither too strong IPR nor too weak IPR are conducive to innovation. Furthermore, the optimal level of IPR in developed countries is higher than that of developing countries; this difference implies that adoption of IPR standard of developed countries may be inefficient for developing countries.

Originality/value

The authors' empirical results uncover new empirical evidence to support “the optimal IPR hypothesis” and provide this field with more detailed and reliable empirical evidence.

Keywords

Citation

Wang, H., Lai, M. and Spivakovsky, M. (2012), "Does IPR promote innovation? New evidence from developed and developing countries", Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, Vol. 4 No. 2, pp. 117-131. https://doi.org/10.1108/17561391211242735

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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