Authentic and congruent leadership providing excellent work environment in palliative care

Gunilla Johansson (Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden and the Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden)
Christer Sandahl (Department of Learning, Informatics Management and Ethics (LIME), Medical Management Centre (MMC), LIME Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden)
Birgitta Andershed (School of Health and Medicine Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden, Department of Palliative Care, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden and the Department of Nursing, Gjøvik University College, Gjøvik, Norway)

Leadership in Health Services

ISSN: 1751-1879

Publication date: 2 May 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of registered nurses (RNs), enrolled nurses (ENs), and leaders (i.e. the first‐line nurse manager, F‐LNM and the substitute F‐LNM) as to what characterises an excellent work environment in a palliative care unit and the involvement of leadership in that environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using two separate instruments: a questionnaire, group interviews with nurses and leaders, and documents at a palliative care unit. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the material.

Findings

According to the participants, the most important component at the palliative care unit was to accomplish the vision of good palliative care. Congruence in leadership, mature group functioning, adequate organisational structures and resources, and comprehensive and shared meaningfulness were all identified as essential components for fulfilling the vision.

Originality/value

This study indicates that fulfilling the vision of good palliative care may function as a buffer against stress in such a workplace

Keywords

Citation

Johansson, G., Sandahl, C. and Andershed, B. (2011), "Authentic and congruent leadership providing excellent work environment in palliative care", Leadership in Health Services, Vol. 24 No. 2, pp. 135-149. https://doi.org/10.1108/17511871111125701

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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