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Linking learning methods to outcomes in public health leadership development

Delesha L. Miller (Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA)
Karl E. Umble (North Carolina Institute for Public Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA)
Steve L. Frederick (Leadership and Management Development Program, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Atlanta, Georgia, USA)
Donna R. Dinkin (National Public Health Leadership Institute, North Carolina Institute for Public Health, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA)

Leadership in Health Services

ISSN: 1751-1879

Article publication date: 8 May 2007

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to present evaluation findings from the National Public Health Leadership Institute (PHLI) regarding how the curriculum's learning methods work singly and together to produce outcomes for learners and their organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Six months after graduation from PHLI, four recent cohorts of PHLI graduates were asked to report overall reactions to PHLI by using an online survey. The survey consisted of quantitative questions about key leadership behaviors taught in the program and the usefulness of PHLI's five learning methods as well as qualitative questions about changes in understanding, skill, practices, and outcomes.

Findings

The evaluation survey yielded a 66 percent response rate (n=133). PHLI's learning methods are interrelated and lead to such outcomes as changed leadership understanding, knowledge and skill development, increased confidence, increased self‐awareness, leadership practice changes, and organizational results. The learning project was strongly associated with development of collaborations, whereas assessment tools and coaching were most often associated with increased self‐awareness.

Research limitations/implications

These preliminary findings support the idea that particular learning methods are related to specific outcomes. However, graduates often integrate information and skills from multiple methods to achieve outcomes. Future research should investigate whether the associations identified in this evaluation are present in other leadership development programs.

Originality/value

This is the first published evaluation that has attempted to link specific learning methods with outcomes for participants of a public health leadership development program.

Keywords

Citation

Miller, D.L., Umble, K.E., Frederick, S.L. and Dinkin, D.R. (2007), "Linking learning methods to outcomes in public health leadership development", Leadership in Health Services, Vol. 20 No. 2, pp. 97-123. https://doi.org/10.1108/17511870710745439

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2007, Emerald Group Publishing Limited