What do surveys of public attitudes to mental health problems really mean (and do we mean what we say)?

Michael Smith (Division of Community‐Based Sciences, University of Glasgow)

Journal of Public Mental Health

ISSN: 1746-5729

Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Campaigns to improve public attitudes to people with mental health problems have yet to show significant impact, according to national surveys. But how reliable are these surveys? Michael Smith reviews recent research in the UK and in Scotland and argues that their findings are complicated by methodological bias and doubts about the public's ability to acknowledge prejudice honestly.

Citation

Smith, M. (2004), "What do surveys of public attitudes to mental health problems really mean (and do we mean what we say)?", Journal of Public Mental Health, Vol. 3 No. 4, pp. 40-48. https://doi.org/10.1108/17465729200400027

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Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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