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Peer health promotion in prisons: a systematic review

Nat Wright (Clinical Director, Prison Health Research, Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust, Leeds, UK)
Adam Bleakley (Medical student at the Medical School, Leeds University, Leeds, UK)
Christine Butt (Clinical Research Fellow, Prison Health Research, Leeds Community Healthcare NHS Trust, Leeds, UK)
Oliver Chadwick (Medical student at the Medical School, Leeds University, Leeds, UK)
Khaver Mahmood (Medical student at the Medical School, Leeds University, Leeds, UK)
Kiran Patel (Medical student at the Medical School, Leeds University, Leeds, UK)
Aicha Salhi (Medical student at the Medical School, Leeds University, Leeds, UK)

International Journal of Prisoner Health

ISSN: 1744-9200

Article publication date: 17 August 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review systematically the available literature relating to the implementation of peer education to promote health and healthy behaviour in prisons.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors undertook a narrative systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Psychinfo, Web of Science and Cochrane databases. Relevant journals and reference lists were hand searched for relevant articles to be included in the review. Of the abstracts found, full‐text papers were retrieved for those papers deemed as possibly fulfilling the inclusion criteria of the review.

Findings

A total of 3,033 abstracts were identified leading to 46 full‐text articles being retrieved, of which ten were included in the review. Peer education in prisons can have an impact on attitudes, knowledge, and behaviour intention regarding HIV risk behaviour. The research findings were inconclusive for the impact of peer education upon illicit drug use and injecting practice. There was a paucity of research evaluating the impact of peer education upon mental ill health, obesity, diet, smoking, or self‐management of chronic physical diseases.

Originality/value

Peer education is effective in reducing risk of HIV transmission. It is possible that peer education for mental health issues is stigmatising, presenting an opportunity for further research activity. The impact of peer education upon illicit drug use practice, obesity, diet, smoking, and self‐management of chronic physical diseases also presents further research opportunities. Research evaluating models of active peer educator involvement in health service delivery and organisation is also lacking.

Keywords

Citation

Wright, N., Bleakley, A., Butt, C., Chadwick, O., Mahmood, K., Patel, K. and Salhi, A. (2011), "Peer health promotion in prisons: a systematic review", International Journal of Prisoner Health, Vol. 7 No. 4, pp. 37-51. https://doi.org/10.1108/17449201111256899

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited