The route to better learning: personalized IT training

Paula Brewer (Director of Bus Stop Training. E‐mail Paula.Brewer@jiconsultancy.co.uk)

Development and Learning in Organizations

ISSN: 1477-7282

Publication date: 1 December 2005

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has been completed based upon adult learning research carried out by Bus Stop™ Training. Their research demonstrated the importance of what enables adults to achieve greater knowledge retention and what drives them to want to learn more.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose for the research was to ensure that the IT training methodology recommended by Bus Stop delivers the following business benefits: skills analysis ensures training given only where pertinent; skills analysis ensures training focuses on modules relevant to student's job function; training modules completed in one hour sections thus ensuring student is not absent from their desk for longer than necessary; and training materials are developed to encourage knowledge retention and “memory joggers” versus complex and non‐relevant training manuals.

Findings

During the course of the research, findings showed that adults do want to better themselves but by taking training that is relevant to them and their job function. They also wish to learn in smaller, peer groups. Companies want the investment made in their employee trainings to be effective immediately. The route taken with Bus Stop enables the employee to put their learning into practice within one hour of a particular module having been taught and, thus, learnt.

Originality/value

This paper is relevant to HR managers, training managers and workers alike. It describes a new, innovative training methodology that focuses on the exact skills required by a certain individual to complete their job function. It assesses the strengths and weaknesses of an individual and then compiles a training course tailored, and relevant, to that individual.

Keywords

Citation

Brewer, P. (2005), "The route to better learning: personalized IT training", Development and Learning in Organizations, Vol. 19 No. 6, pp. 7-8. https://doi.org/10.1108/14777280510624240

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Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2005, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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