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Training, knowledge and confidence in safeguarding adults: results from a postal survey of the health and social care sector in a single county

Lindsey Pike (KTP Associate and PhD Student, based at University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK)
Tony Gilbert (Deputy Head of School, School of Social Science and Social Work,based at University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK)
Corinne Leverton (Continuing Professional Development Worker for the Private, Independent and Voluntary Sector, based at Learning and Development Unit, Adult Care and Support, Cornwall Council, Truro, UK)
Roger Indge (Retired Learning Training and Development Manager, based at Learning and Development Unit, Adult Care and Support, Cornwall Council, Truro, UK)
Deirdre Ford (Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Plymouth, Plymouth, UK)

The Journal of Adult Protection

ISSN: 1466-8203

Article publication date: 10 October 2011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the relationship between safeguarding adults training, staff knowledge and confidence.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 647 responses from a cross sectional postal sample survey of the health and social care sector in Cornwall, were analysed.

Findings

Differences in knowledge and confidence around safeguarding were observed between staff groups and agencies. Training contributed to an approximately 20 per cent increase in knowledge and a ceiling effect was noted. Confidence linked knowledge and action. More confident staff offered more sophisticated responses regarding improving safeguarding processes.

Research limitations/implications

Low response rates and the specific context limit generalisability. Knowledge and confidence measures were simplistic. Further research is needed on the mechanism of action by which safeguarding adults training is effective.

Practical implications

Safeguarding adults training and a targeted approach to the analysis of learning needs should be debated in the context of training transfer. Training should be evaluated to ascertain its effectiveness.

Originality/value

This is the first major multi‐agency UK survey of its kind. Findings provide a baseline for further research.

Keywords

Citation

Pike, L., Gilbert, T., Leverton, C., Indge, R. and Ford, D. (2011), "Training, knowledge and confidence in safeguarding adults: results from a postal survey of the health and social care sector in a single county", The Journal of Adult Protection, Vol. 13 No. 5, pp. 259-274. https://doi.org/10.1108/14668201111178175

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited