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Learning to swim with sharks: Caribbean and African telecommunications regulatory experience under monopoly conditions (1993‐2003)

A. Vindelyn Smith‐Hillman (Senior Lecturer Economics and Economics Awards Leader, University College Northampton, Northampton, UK)
Terrence Wendell Brathwaite (Senior Lecturer (Global Commercial and Industrial Law), Coventry University, Coventry, UK)

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ISSN: 1463-6697

Article publication date: 1 October 2004

Abstract

This paper contrasts the regulatory experience of the telecommunications industry in two regions, Africa and the Caribbean. Whilst possessing some socio‐economic similarities, they remain quite distinct in terms of size and political history. In particular the relatively more stable Caribbean political history has secured a firm basis for the democratic process and the development of institutional infrastructure supportive of good governance. Therefore, despite a monopoly telecommunications structure evident in both regions, the Caribbean has generally been more successful in forestalling anti‐competitive behaviour than in the case of African economies. In this respect a critical role has been played by competition policy supporting the view of the prominence of legislative endowments in informing regulatory governance.

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Citation

Vindelyn Smith‐Hillman, A. and Wendell Brathwaite, T. (2004), "Learning to swim with sharks: Caribbean and African telecommunications regulatory experience under monopoly conditions (1993‐2003)", info, Vol. 6 No. 5, pp. 308-317. https://doi.org/10.1108/14636690410564816

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited