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Innovation generation process: Applying the adopter categorization model and concept of “chasm” to better understand social and behavioral issues

Boaz Bernstein (School of Management, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia)
Prakash J. Singh (Department of Management, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia)

European Journal of Innovation Management

ISSN: 1460-1060

Article publication date: 1 August 2008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the social and behavioral actions, activities and practices in order to group them together to create behavior‐based profiles that characterize the various stages of the innovation generation processes within organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative data were collected from nine Australian companies from the biotechnology sector. Using the grounded theory approach to data analysis, labels from Rogers' adopter categorization model were used to broadly identify and classify typical actions, activities, practices and behaviors exhibited within organizations that can be described as being “innovator”, “early adopter”, “early majority”, “late majority” or “laggard” types. Further, Moore's metaphor of “chasm” was applied to explore the nature of difficulties that organizations face in converting innovative ideas into commercially successful products and services.

Findings

The use of the labels from the categories of the adopter categorization model enabled suitable behavior‐based profiles to be developed.

Originality/value

The use of the adopter categorization model provides a fuller and richer insight into the innovation generation process. The model can also be used to assess more holistically the viability of innovations as they progress from inception to commercialization.

Keywords

Citation

Bernstein, B. and Singh, P.J. (2008), "Innovation generation process: Applying the adopter categorization model and concept of “chasm” to better understand social and behavioral issues", European Journal of Innovation Management, Vol. 11 No. 3, pp. 366-388. https://doi.org/10.1108/14601060810889017

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited