Synthesizing seeming incompatibilities to foster knowledge creation and innovation

Jader Zelaya‐Zamora (Based at the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Decision Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan)
Dai Senoo (Based at the Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Graduate School of Decision Science and Technology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Japan)

Journal of Knowledge Management

ISSN: 1367-3270

Publication date: 15 February 2013

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an example of how an apparently incongruent combination of organizational variables can have a positive effect on innovation through knowledge creation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous theory, four original hypotheses were developed and later tested with empirical data collected from 125 research and development organizations in Japan, using analysis of variance and regression analysis.

Findings

Managerial influences and resources can significantly interact to generate a combined impact on the knowledge creation capability of organizations, which in turn is positively associated with their innovation performance. In particular, long‐term managerial influences were found to have a greater impact on knowledge creation when combined with knowledge‐exploitation resources. Synthesizing short‐term managerial influences with knowledge‐exploitation resources is not better than combining them with exploration resources. This holds true especially for organizations of small and medium size.

Research limitations/implications

This study only evaluates one case of many possibilities of seemingly antithetical combinations that can also have a beneficial impact in organizations. A larger and diverse sample, together with enhanced dimensions of managerial influences and organizational resources can make this study's implications much more universal.

Practical implications

An ingenious and purposeful synthesis of organizational variables conventionally seen as incompatible and contradictory can in reality benefit organizational goals related to knowledge creation and innovation.

Originality/value

This study puts forward a unique framework and perspective highlighting the importance of combinatory effects and the management of duality in organizations.

Keywords

Citation

Zelaya‐Zamora, J. and Senoo, D. (2013), "Synthesizing seeming incompatibilities to foster knowledge creation and innovation", Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 17 No. 1, pp. 106-122. https://doi.org/10.1108/13673271311300822

Download as .RIS

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Please note you might not have access to this content

You may be able to access this content by login via Shibboleth, Open Athens or with your Emerald account.
If you would like to contact us about accessing this content, click the button and fill out the form.
To rent this content from Deepdyve, please click the button.