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What knowledge managers really do: an empirical and comparative analysis

Arben Asllani (Arben Asllani is a Professor of Management in the Department of Management, University of Tennessee‐Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN, USA (beni‐asllani@utc.edu).)
Fred Luthans (Fred Luthans is a Professor of Management in the Department of Management, College of Business, University of Nebraska‐Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA (fluthans1@unl.edu).)

Journal of Knowledge Management

ISSN: 1367-3270

Article publication date: 1 August 2003

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Abstract

The advent of information technology has generated not only interest in how to acquire, store and “mine” data, but also how to manage knowledge. Yet, there is still considerable confusion and a lack of understanding of what today’s knowledge managers really do. Continuing a stream of previous research on the behavior activities of traditional managers, this study investigated the relative amount of time today’s knowledge managers (N=307) spend on traditional management functions, communications, human resources and networking. Besides identifying what knowledge managers really do, this study examined what successful knowledge managers do. Comparisons are then made with managers in the 1980s. Finally, the role that information technology plays in knowledge managers carrying out their managerial activities was assessed. The implications of some surprising findings and conclusions end the paper.

Keywords

Citation

Asllani, A. and Luthans, F. (2003), "What knowledge managers really do: an empirical and comparative analysis", Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol. 7 No. 3, pp. 53-66. https://doi.org/10.1108/13673270310485622

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MCB UP Ltd

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