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Organizational benefits of having emotionally intelligent managers and employees

Pamela R. Johnson (Pamela R. Johnson is a Professor in the Department of Management, California State University, Chico, California, USA)
Julie Indvik (Julie Indvik is a Professors in the Department of Management, California State University, Chico, California, USA)

Journal of Workplace Learning

ISSN: 1366-5626

Article publication date: 1 May 1999

6706

Abstract

In decades past, workers were, in effect, told to leave their emotions at home and most complied. No more. A person with high emotional intelligence (EI) has the ability to understand and relate to people. In fact, this skill is now considered to have greater impact on individual and group performance than traditional measures of intelligence such as IQ. When emotional intelligence is present, there is increased employee cooperation, increased motivation, increased productivity, and increased profits. However, emotional intelligence is lacking in the US workplace. This lack is clearly chronicled in the comic strip, Dilbert, where Scott Adams, the creator, lampoons what occurs in the workplace: vapid corporate‐speak with no guts and no emotionally‐honest message. This article defines emotional intelligence, describes how the comic strip, Dilbert, daily depicts situations where emotional intelligence is lacking, and discusses the organizational benefits of having emotionally intelligent managers and employees.

Keywords

Citation

Johnson, P.R. and Indvik, J. (1999), "Organizational benefits of having emotionally intelligent managers and employees", Journal of Workplace Learning, Vol. 11 No. 3, pp. 84-88. https://doi.org/10.1108/13665629910264226

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1999, MCB UP Limited

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