To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Participant‐created case studies in professional training

Jean W. Ross (Jean W. Ross is Writer and Editor, The Center for Child and Family Studies, College of Social Work, University of South Carolina, USA.)
Lois Wright (Lois Wright is Director, The Center for Child and Family Studies, College of Social Work, University of South Carolina, USA.)

Journal of Workplace Learning

ISSN: 1366-5626

Article publication date: 1 February 2000

Abstract

Case studies have long been a staple ingredient of professional training, but among the challenges of using them are the difficulty of ensuring that their situations and elements accurately reflect the complexity of current case reality, achieving applicability across networking agencies, and the time they can take to create or obtain. The Center for Child and Family Studies is increasingly having participants create their own case studies for use in ongoing professional training. Practically, this method has several advantages. Theoretically, it is in keeping with constructivist values and the principles of adult learning. Though it does not work in every training situation in which cases may be used, it can greatly enrich training and training outcomes where it is feasible.

Keywords

Citation

Ross, J.W. and Wright, L. (2000), "Participant‐created case studies in professional training", Journal of Workplace Learning, Vol. 12 No. 1, pp. 23-28. https://doi.org/10.1108/13665620010309765

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 2000, MCB UP Limited