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Using learning as a construct to measure civilian review board impact on the police: The Philippine experience

Melchor C. de Guzman (School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University South Bend, South Bend, Indiana, USA)
James Frank (Division of Criminal Justice, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA)

Policing: An International Journal

ISSN: 1363-951X

Article publication date: 1 June 2004

Abstract

Determining the impact of civilian review board on the police is a challenging process. The task is complicated due to the absence of baseline data that will account for observed changes in citizen complaints, especially if the concept is a novelty in a particular jurisdiction. Likewise, using traditional measures of impact such as the number of complaints or conviction rates is problematic due to a variety of confounding factors. This study examines the perceptions of complainants and officers concerning the impact of civilian review boards. Using data collected through surveys of police officers and complainants in a metropolitan area in the Philippines, the study focuses on “learning” as a viable construct to measure the impact of civilian review boards and the perceived deterrent effects of these boards. The research found that civilian review boards have a significant impact on police officer perceptions as well as on the police department. The study also shows that learning may be a viable measure for studying the impact of civilian review boards.

Keywords

Citation

de Guzman, M.C. and Frank, J. (2004), "Using learning as a construct to measure civilian review board impact on the police: The Philippine experience", Policing: An International Journal, Vol. 27 No. 2, pp. 166-182. https://doi.org/10.1108/13639510410536805

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2004, Emerald Group Publishing Limited