To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Expanding the temporal context of research on non‐permanent work: Previous experience, duration of and time remaining on contracts and employment continuity expectations

Michael Clinton (King's College London, London, UK)
Claudia Bernhard‐Oettel (Stockholms Universitet, Stockholm, Sweden)
Thomas Rigotti (Universität Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany)
Jeroen de Jong (Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands)

Career Development International

ISSN: 1362-0436

Article publication date: 24 May 2011

Downloads
1446

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore an expanded temporal context of non‐permanent work through an examination of the influence of previous experience of temporary working, contract duration and time remaining on contract and expectations of continued employment on reports of job insecurity, job satisfaction, in‐role performance and organisational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using responses of 1,169 temporary workers from a multi‐national, cross‐sectional questionnaire study.

Findings

Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that having previous experience of temporary work was associated with higher in‐role performance. No significant effects were found for contract duration, but shorter time remaining on present contract was associated with greater job insecurity and also greater in‐role performance. However the strongest effects were found for expectations of continued employment, with stronger expectations being linked to more positive reports of each outcome. A number of moderation effects were found that indicated interactions between temporal variables and revealed a moderating role of preference for temporary work.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to formally consider the influence of a broader temporal context on attitudes and behaviours of temporary workers. Significant associations were found between elements relating to each of the past, present and future and important individual and organisational variables in the present. These effects were sustained above and beyond the influence of variables such as country, sector, preferences, skill level, contract type, and demographics that are known to affect temporary workers' attitudes and behaviours.

Keywords

Citation

Clinton, M., Bernhard‐Oettel, C., Rigotti, T. and de Jong, J. (2011), "Expanding the temporal context of research on non‐permanent work: Previous experience, duration of and time remaining on contracts and employment continuity expectations", Career Development International, Vol. 16 No. 2, pp. 114-139. https://doi.org/10.1108/13620431111115596

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2011, Emerald Group Publishing Limited